Can You Use Diesel Fuel In Place Of Kerosene?

In a kerosene heater, any diesel fuel will work. The type of diesel you choose, though, may have an impact on performance.

As a general rule, you should use #1 diesel or ULSD heating oil in your heater.

It doesn’t matter if it’s dyed red or not; red diesel is less taxed and consequently less expensive than clear diesel.

#1 Diesel

This diesel is extremely similar to kerosene. It burns cleaner than diesel #2 since the paraffin wax has been removed. Because it has a higher viscosity than #2 diesel, it draws up the wick faster and is less likely to gel in cold conditions.

#2 Diesel

Diesel #2 has a lower level of refinement than diesel #1. In a kerosene heater, it will operate, but it will not burn as cleanly or easily as diesel #1. It is, nevertheless, less expensive and has a higher energy capacity.

Why is it dyed red?

The difference between dyed diesel and clear diesel purchased at the pump is insignificant. The dye is there for tax reasons: on-road diesel is taxed at a greater rate than off-road diesel.

Because red diesel does not have a road tax, it is substantially less expensive than clear diesel.

It’s legal to use in a heater.

Red diesel, on the other hand, is illegal to use in a car.

Red-dyed diesel used to have a higher sulfur content than clear fuel.

This isn’t the case any longer.

All red diesel for off-road vehicles must be ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) as of 2014, which means it must contain fewer than 15 parts per million of sulfur.

Diesel Heating Oil

This is when things become perplexing. Heating oil, like off-road diesel, is coloured red. This is to distinguish it from on-road diesel, which is taxed. Heating oil, on the other hand, isn’t usually the same as the red-dyed diesel used in tractors and other off-road vehicles.

The Clean Air Act does not apply to heating oil, which can contain more than 15 parts per million of sulfur.

If used in an unvented kerosene heater, certain home heating oil may contain significant levels of sulfur and may stink!

However, the majority of residential heating oil is ULSD.

This is because New York and several other Northeastern states now have rules stating that home heating oil cannot contain more than 15 parts per million sulfur.

As a result, practically all diesel heating oil sold in the Northeast is ULSD, and your kerosene heater will not stink.

Biodiesel

Yes, biodiesel can be used in a kerosene heater. When you buy biodiesel, you may expect it to include 5% organics and 95% diesel. It works just as well in a kerosene heater as it does in a standard diesel heater. If you create your own biodiesel, the purity and viscosity of the finished product will determine how well it burns.

What can be used instead of kerosene?

Lamp-Specific Substitutes Lamps can be filled with generic lamp oil instead of kerosene. Lamp oil is typically more expensive than kerosene, but it burns cleaner and has a lower odor. Citronella oil can be used in wick lamps, although it produces more smoke and soot and fouls wicks more quickly.

Can you use diesel fuel in a heater?

In almost all furnaces, diesel, as supplied at many gas stations, is a suitable replacement for home heating oil. It’s best to turn off your furnace before putting the diesel into your heating oil tank, then wait around 10 minutes before turning it back on.

Is diesel fuel and kerosene the same thing?

If you go about on the internet, you can come across a forum question like this:

In most cases, the responses are mixed. ‘Don’t worry, you’ll be OK,’ said half of the people. “Watch out for ________,” the other half will warn.

Regular diesel is referred to as #2 diesel fuel oil, whereas kerosene is referred to as #1 diesel fuel oil. Some people believe it is similar enough to conventional (#2) diesel fuel that they may try to use it interchangeably. What would motivate them to do so, and what problems may they face?

What Makes Kerosene What It Is

The qualities of kerosene determine what happens when it is burned. Because kerosene is a lighter diesel oil than #2, it is referred to as #1 diesel. Because of its smaller weight, it has somewhat less energy – roughly 135,000 BTU per gallon vs. 139,000 BTU for #2.

Aromatic compounds are often concentrated in #2 and heavier diesel fuel oils; kerosene does not have extremely significant levels of them. This is one of the reasons why #2 diesel burns drier and with less lubricity than kerosene.

Drier burn

The most prevalent worry is kerosene’s dry burn, which can harm gasoline pumps. In comparison to #2 diesel, kerosene has extremely little lubricity. When running on kerosene, gasoline pumps without lubricity suffer a lot of wear and may burn out. Additional wearable pieces, such as rings, gaskets, and valves, are mentioned by some. Adding some automatic transmission fluid to the kerosene is a simple cure for this. In this case, 2-cycle oil can also be used.

Hotter burn?

Some will argue that kerosene burns hotter than #2 diesel, resulting in worries about rings being burned out. Others argue that because kerosene has a lower energy value, it will not burn at a higher temperature.

The fact that kerosene has less total energy than #2 is undeniable. However, having less total energy simply means that a gallon of kerosene produces less total heat than a gallon of standard on-road diesel.

Kerosene has a lower viscosity than gasoline, which allows it to burn at a higher temperature in an engine.

Cutting Diesel with Kerosene

Kerosene can be combined with diesel fuel for a few advantages. Kerosene is particularly beneficial in the winter for modifying the cold weather handling temperatures of diesel fuel. The rule of thumb is that adding ten percent kerosene to a diesel fuel blend lowers the cold filter plugging point by five degrees. It may be more cost effective to use kerosene as a mixer than than a cold flow polymer in extremely cold climates.

To reduce emissions, kerosene and #2 are mixed together. According to the theory, kerosene “burns cleaner” than #2, resulting in lesser pollutants.

What is the same as kerosene?

The terms kerosene and paraffin have become interchangeable over time, with many people confusing the two fuels. This is most likely owing to the fact that they are both extremely comparable types of oil.

In the United Kingdom, kerosene is commonly referred to as paraffin, but it is also known as kerosene in areas of East and South Africa. If you ever find yourself in America and need kerosene, we recommend asking for kerosene instead of paraffin.

Can I use diesel in my kerosene heater?

Number 1 diesel is the most suitable substitute for kerosene. There are a variety of reasons why you would want to utilize diesel. Kerosene, for example, is double – and occasionally three times – the price of diesel. Furthermore, if there are no kerosene merchants nearby, diesel is commonly available and accessible.

However, if you want to use diesel, you must take some care to ensure that the process is safe for both you and the heater. The following are some important pointers to keep in mind:

  • Diesel Additive – To guarantee that the diesel burns cleanly and without damaging the wick, you’ll need to add an additive to it. Kerosene, kerosene additive, and isopropyl alcohol are some of the varieties that are advised.
  • Number 2 Diesel – This is a more substantial type of fuel, so stay away from it. In the next paragraph, we’ll look at the characteristics that make number 2 diesel such a good choice.
  • A good wick – The diesel will help the candle burn faster. It’s critical to find a 100 percent wick that can withstand such a high rate of burning.

You could get up and feed the machine number 1 diesel if you absolutely need your heater to function and you’re out of kerosene. This type of fuel differs from number 2 diesel in that it has qualities comparable to kerosene, such as:

  • It doesn’t contain as many aromatic compounds that can be harmful to your health if discharged into the atmosphere.
  • It produces roughly 135,000 BTU per gallon, which is less than number 2 diesel but comparable to kerosene power.
  • Burns cleaner than #2 diesel, creating less wick damage and releasing energy into the environment at a slower rate.
  • When compared to number 2 diesel, it requires less lubricative power to burn, although it still requires more than regular kerosene.

Kerosene heaters are one of the most commonly used heating gadgets in apartments, houses, and rooms. Their popularity has been continuously growing due to their inexpensive operating costs and long-lasting performances. Many kerosene heater owners, on the other hand, have fallen into the trap of just adding any fuel or combustible liquid to it.

Such liquids can generate heat and hence achieve a similar result to kerosene. Continuous use of such compounds, on the other hand, may cause damage to your heater’s internal mechanics. Worse, they could be emitting poisonous particles that are harmful to your health.

Can I mix diesel and kerosene in my heater?

Yes, diesel can be used in a kerosene heater. Kerosene heaters are multi-fuel heaters that can operate on a variety of fuels, including diesel. In a kerosene heater, you can even use pure vegetable oil! However, some fuels operate better in a kerosene heater than others.

What burns hotter kerosene or diesel fuel?

Because kerosene has a lower viscosity than diesel, it burns hotter. This can assist heat the house, but it can also cause issues if the heater isn’t designed to manage heat that’s hotter than regular heating oil heat. The heat from a kerosene heater may readily heat a standard home in a warm environment if your furnace is suitable for kerosene, according to “The Decatur Daily News.” When diesel is unavailable, kerosene heating oil K-1 is typically utilized; nevertheless, it is more expensive than its diesel cousin. Installing a fuel oil heater also makes it comparable to standard No. 1 heating oil, which is useful if you choose to swap oils later.

Can I make kerosene?

Kerosene is a flammable liquid mixture of chemicals created during crude oil distillation. Crude oil is distilled in a distillation tower to make kerosene, which is similar to how diesel and gasoline are made. In the refining process, it is a medium-weight distillate that can be made by distilling crude oil (known as straight run kerosene in this case) or by cracking heavier petroleum (here it is known as cracked kerosene). Kerosene is a complex mixture of paraffins (55.2%), naphthenes (40.9%), and aromatic hydrocarbons, with a chemical makeup of 55.2 percent paraffins, 40.9 percent naphthenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons (3.9 percent ). Kerosene usually contains hydrocarbons with 11 to 13 carbon atoms in its chains. Hexane and benzene are among the potentially hazardous chemicals found in liquid kerosene fuels.