Do You Need To Warm Up A Diesel Engine?

Mr4X4: Is a longer (than suggested) warm-up time beneficial or detrimental to the engine’s longevity? Or are they simply spending unnecessary hours on the engine and burning fuel?

Tony: Because older diesel vehicles lack the pollution controls seen in newer diesels, longer warm-up times do not harm the engine. All this accomplishes is add hours to the engine’s life and waste fuel. Excessive idle times can cause DPFs and EGR valves in modern diesels to function in ways that the manufacturer does not advocate. This practice may cause the intake manifolds to soot up more than usual, and the DPFs to choke up more quickly, resulting in more burns and excessive fuel use. Modern diesels are entirely computer-controlled; some lower performance by limiting fuel flow until the vehicle is warm enough. The engine will not be harmed by going off at a steady pace and taking it easy for the first few minutes of the journey. Taking off and excessively increasing the RPMs and load on a cold engine will result in undue wear and damage. Modern diesel automobiles have more advanced cooling systems than older models, and they are engineered to warm up rapidly. Allowing the vehicle to start and idle for a minute or two would not harm it and will only benefit it, but anything more is, in my opinion, needless. It simply creates extra noise in the caravan park, needless odors, and so on for no benefit.

Mr4X4: Is there any benefit to letting your four-wheel drive idle for five minutes after pulling up for cool-down? It made sense when turbos were exclusively oil-cooled, but with newer turbos that have both water and oil cooling, is there really any point?

Tony: Idle-down depends a lot on the conditions you’ve been driving in. Five minutes is well worth it if you’ve been working hard right up until you pull up to turn it off. It would be good to just shut down if you idle around town, then get to the caravan park and reverse your van into its position. You’ve basically done the job of the turbo timer anyhow. When compared to older wastegated turbos, VNT (Variable Nozzle Turbine) turbos spin at idle and at a pretty high speed. Idle time is more about regulating temperature and allowing it to drop before cooling down.

How long does a diesel engine take to warm up?

If the temperature is below zero degrees Fahrenheit, allow your engine to warm up for up to seven minutes. If the temperature is between zero and fifty degrees Fahrenheit, warming up should take three to five minutes. Warming up takes only one to two minutes when the temperature is above fifty degrees.

How do you warm up a diesel engine?

You aren’t allowing your engine to warm up.

Don’t be the guy who starts his hot engine and cranks it up right away. The only thing you’re bragging about is your ignorance of the fact that cold, thick oil will not adequately lube your turbo and engine bearings. Allow your engine to warm up in the same way as you would in the morning. Allow the intake heater and glow plugs to do their jobs. Start the engine and give it some time to warm up evenly from the combustion heat.

Should you wait for engine to warm up?

Long before it reaches peak working temperature, an engine is thoroughly lubricated. Oil leaks to the bottom of the oil pan while your automobile sits for an extended amount of time. When you start the engine, the oil pump circulates the oil fast throughout the engine, lubricating all of the working parts. A cold engine idles at 1,200 rpm or higher, making the lubrication procedure go by quickly. Giving your engine a chance to lubricate, as well as doing routine maintenance, can extend the life of most modern engines to 200,000 miles or more.

With older engines, there was a saying that starting them was the worst thing you could do because they were fairly dry and not well lubricated with oil for a split second.

Modern automobiles have advanced to the point where your engine is fully oiled in 20 to 30 seconds. The engine may not be fully warmed by the time you get in, start the car, buckle up, and get comfortable, but it’s fully lubricated and you’re ready to drive.

When the weather gets colder in the winter, it’s a good idea to let the car idle for a minute. Some drivers like to let the engine idle for 20 minutes or longer to thoroughly warm everything—including the cabin—but driving is the quickest way to warm up an engine. Just remember not to rev the engine hard for the first few minutes of driving, until the temperature gauge starts to move away from the cold reading.

In terms of comfort, driving the automobile warms it up in a matter of minutes vs idling for 15 or 20 minutes. Idling over an extended period of time is a waste of gas.

Why do diesel engines take so long to warm up?

When you’re traveling somewhere exceptionally cold, the fact that a diesel-powered vehicle takes longer to warm up than a gas-powered vehicle matters since it can take a long time for the cabin to get up to a suitable temperature. If you have a diesel engine, it will also take longer for your windows to defrost because your airflow system will be pushing out cold air for longer until it warms up.

Although it isn’t a major issue, you must wait a few moments before starting an older diesel engine, whereas a petrol vehicle can be started immediately away. Because the glow plugs must heat up before the diesel can be ignited, starting a diesel vehicle frequently necessitates a two-step ignition process.

Can you leave a diesel running all night?

Mark and Jamie Womble park their 18-wheeler in the snowy lot behind Trader Alan’s Truck Stop along Interstate 95 around 12 p.m. Eight more trucks have already arrived and are parked side by side. Despite the fact that this is a truck “stop,” their diesel engines are still going.

The Wombles, a husband-and-wife driving duo, will also come to a halt – but not completely. While they enjoy lunch with the other drivers at the restaurant, their truck will idle outside, rumbling gently to keep the engine and fuel warm in the frigid weather.

Hundreds of thousands of diesel trucks idling at truck stops across the United States, according to a research by the American Trucking Association, are a serious emissions problem.

Even though the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently reduced the sulfur content of diesel fuel to reduce pollution, if the trucking industry is unable to reduce idling trucks, stronger federal emissions regulations may be imposed.

The number of hours wasted idling by the projected 1.28 million long-haul diesel trucks on American roadways is in the billions. Truck stops are significant stationary sources of CO2, NOx, CO2, and volatile organic pollutants. Trucks transport 56 percent of all freight in the United States.

According to Vic Suski, senior automotive engineer of the American Trucking Association (ATA), a gallon of diesel fuel consumed at idle produces 2.5 times the amount of ozone components in the air as a gallon burned on the road.

According to the American Trucking Association’s Vehicle Maintenance Council, the average diesel truck travels 130,000 miles per year and spends 6,316 hours on the road. However, it has only been hauling freight for 3,095 hours, which is less than half of the period. The vehicle has been operating but halted for 3,221 hours, the engine rumbling at a low idle. According to another estimate, truck pauses account for around half of the idle time.

“The community around the truck stop is facing the brunt of these pollution,” says Steve Allen, a project manager with Boston-based Energy Research Group, an energy consultancy business.

Weather circumstances, economic demands, and old habits are all reasons why truckers, both independent owner-operators and fleet drivers, leave their engines idling.

The engine and fuel tank of a vehicle must stay warm in cold weather. Heaters, lighting, and other appliances in the living space right behind the driver, where he or she sleeps, eats, reads, and watches TV, all require power. Cabs and perishable cargoes must be chilled in the summer.

Mr. Suski said, “A lot of drivers are under the gun.” “They have to make a drop, and if the engine won’t start in the dead of winter, or at any other moment, they’re done….” Allowing her to be inactive is the best way to avoid this.” It might cost up to $100 to jump-start a diesel engine. Minor repairs could cost as little as $300.

Despite truck manufacturers’ promises to the contrary, many drivers believe that stopping and starting a diesel engine causes unnecessary wear. Many drivers will not wait the recommended five minutes for the engine to cool down before turning it off. They simply leave the motor idle at a truck stop while they eat, shower, or shop.

“Except in freezing weather, there is no reason to leave an engine idling,” Mr. Allen explains. “Many drivers believe it is healthy for the engine, and it is difficult to break established habits.”

Only the Edison Electrical Institute (EEI) in Washington, D.C., has recommended truck-stop electrification as a feasible solution, according to the trucking industry. Truck stops would be equipped with outlets for “electrified” vehicles to connect into upon arrival, similar to how trailer parks give electricity to their customers.

Heaters for the engine and fuel tank, a heating/cooling device for the cab, and an automatic shutdown to kill the engine five minutes after stopping would all be built into the truck. According to Eric Blume of Electric Perspectives magazine, most of the components are currently available, and retrofitting a vehicle with the equipment would cost between $1,500 and $2,000. The electricity utilized would be paid for by the truckers.

“A truck costs around $3,400 a year to idle,” says Mike McGrath, director of client programs at EEI, whereas plugging in a truck only $1,369. “We are solely advocating this proposal for its economic benefits,” he argues.

The plan’s initial cost to a truck stop is estimated to be $1,500 per outlet, with a payback period of 8 to 16 months, according to EEI.

Even if diesel fuel sales decline, truck-stop owners would make roughly 76 cents per hour if they sold power. According to an EEI estimate, the truck owner, particularly the owner-operator, would save more than $3,500 year in gasoline and extend engine life.

According to the EEI, an hour of idling time equals 80 highway miles of engine wear. Engines would live longer if idle hours were decreased in half or more under the plan.

Annual carbon reductions under the strategy are estimated to be around 30%. “This is an opportunity to minimize emissions while also making money for truckers and truck-stop businesses,” Mr. Allen says.

The EPA, the ATA, the National Association of Truck Stop Operators, and the Electric Power Research Institute have created an informal consortium to reach agreement on the plan’s provisions. Within two years, pilot initiatives at several new truck stops would commence. “We’re also going to talk to drivers personally,” Allen says.

How cold is too cold for a diesel?

When it comes to diesel trucks, how cold is too cold? At 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9.5 degrees Celsius), the diesel fuel in your fuel tank will gel and you will have problems starting your engine. Your diesel vehicle will have troubles if the temperature drops below 15 degrees Fahrenheit / -9.5 degrees Celsius. The diesel won’t be frozen solid, but it won’t be liquid either. You must now rely on heating solutions such as block heaters and glow plugs, which are not available on all diesel engines.

There’s a lot of debate regarding what temperature is too cold for a diesel truck. On the internet, it is stated that the freezing point of diesel fuel is roughly -112 degrees Fahrenheit or -80 degrees Celsius. Now you believe you will never be in a region that gets that cold, so you should be fine. Wrong.

It is not necessary for the diesel in your fuel tank and fuel lines to be solidly frozen to cause you problems. When the temperature drops below 15 degrees Fahrenheit / – 9.5 degrees Celsius, the diesel fuel begins to change shape and becomes more like a gel. Consider a gel-like fuel that travels from the fuel tank to the engine. Traveling through the fuel lines would be difficult, and you would have difficulty starting your engine in the frigid winter.