Does Diesel Dissolve Plastic?

Polyethylene is used to make plastic barrels for industrial use because it is a tough yet pliable plastic. HDPE, or high-density polyethylene, is used to make industrial-grade plastic barrels that are specifically designed to contain industrial items.

Food-grade HDPE drums are safe enough to store edible, consumable commodities before they reach the market, while hazardous waste drums are sturdy enough to hold hazardous waste for long periods of time. Plastic drums have a wide range of applications, so it’s no surprise that they can also be used to store diesel fuel.

However, before you start filling plastic drums with fuel, make sure the drum is marked as acceptable for use as a plastic oil drum and that it was made of HDPE. Not every plastic can properly contain diesel fuel without polluting it or breaking down quickly.

You must still evaluate how long you can securely store the fuel once you have an industrial standard plastic oil drum. Unfortunately, diesel fuel cannot be stored in plastic drums indefinitely. Even if the drum is made of HDPE, the diesel will react with the plastic polymers over time. The plastic will eventually degrade, resulting in leaks. The diesel fuel may also begin to break down and become unfit for use.

Diesel fuel should not be stored for more than six months, according to government standards. You must then replace your drum and dispose of your diesel fuel. Other factors may have an impact on this limit. Extreme heat or temperature variations, for example, will cause the fuel to breakdown more quickly.

How long can you keep diesel in a plastic container?

In temperatures of 85 degrees, diesel fuel can last for 6 to 12 months. The fuel will then start to react with the oxygen in the tank. Diesel may become sticky as a result of this interaction. If diesel turns sticky, it can block fuel filters, causing engine problems. The sticky fuel will not burn properly, resulting in a film of soot and carbon on the engine’s inside. One possibility is to apply oxidation-resisting stability treatments.

Degradation of diesel fuel can also be caused by other sources. Fungus can grow in the presence of water in the fuel. Fungi can produce organic chemicals that break down diesel molecules. The gumming process can be accelerated by high temperatures. When metals like zinc and copper come into contact with diesel fuel, they can trigger a chemical reaction. Certain chemicals have been shown to hasten the aging process.

Is it safe to store diesel in plastic containers?

The most serious issue with plastic drums is that fuel can react with the plastic and cause it to break down.

HDPE (High-Density Polyethylene), a polymer-based plastic, is commonly used to make plastic drums. Fuel rapidly interacts with the bonds that hold those polymers in place and give the plastic its shape and strength.

As the links between the plastic and the fuel are disturbed over time, the plastic drum eventually breaks down. This results in a hazardous storage container as well as cross-contamination, which will alter the fuel’s chemical composition.

Can I put diesel in a water container?

Anyone who works with diesel fuel, from builders and landscapers to delivery companies and auto dealerships, is aware that water issues are a constant concern. Whether you preserve it for a long time or not, this is the situation. You’re in big trouble if water gets into your diesel fuel system. Contamination of water wreaks havoc on this powerplant. Let’s have a look at the primary reasons why water and diesel don’t mix.

We all know that water freezes. However, did you know that it freezes faster than gasoline? Here’s an example of a comparison:

When water gets into your gasoline, it freezes, resulting in issues such as power loss, clogged filters, corrosion of fuel parts, and injector damage. That’s why, if there’s water, you’ll notice greater problems in the winter.

Gas is more refined than diesel, so while having water in your gas tank is bad, it’s even worse with diesel because it holds on to more water. In addition to the issues listed above, your engine’s lifespan may be shortened, and repairs may be costly. If you need to repair a fuel injector because it exploded, for example, it will be expensive.

Diesel and water, like oil and water, do not mix; instead, they separate. As a result, if you have water in your tank, it will settle to the bottom. Your tank will corrode and algae will bloom as a result of that water. Rust floats about in your gasoline filters, obstructing and ruining them. Bacteria create waste and continue to eat away at the engine and its components.

It’s not uncommon for condensation to form and then dissipate as the temperature outside changes. That isn’t the issue. It occurs when there is an excessive concentration of water. When this happens, problems like engine power loss arise. Examine the fuel; if it’s clear, that’s a good sign. There’s a problem if it isn’t, for example, if it’s cloudy. That is why routine maintenance is critical.

There’s a good likelihood you have water difficulties if you notice your vehicle or equipment isn’t performing well, especially if the idling is inconsistent. If the engine cuts off during acceleration, there are two alternative ways to tell.

Microbes multiply quickly in your tank, produce waste, and are difficult to eradicate. This is especially true if the underlying water problem isn’t addressed, as bacteria and fungus require water to survive.

A gasoline additive might work if there isn’t much water in the tank. Otherwise, the tank will have to be drained. If you have an above-ground tank, this is the best and most complete option. After that, clean the inside and remove any rust or corrosion. If you haven’t done this in a long time, your tank may need to be fixed or replaced. Ricochet Fuel can assist you.

Call Ricochet Fuel at 833-724-2789 to learn more about our tank testing and maintenance services.

We offer portable gasoline tanks in addition to permanent tank installations. We’re here to help you save time and money while also answering any questions you may have.

Is it legal to store diesel at home?

At any given time, you’re only allowed to keep a particular amount of properly stored gasoline at home.

Individuals without a license are only allowed to store 30 litres of gasoline, according to the Health and Safety Executive. However, there are several constraints on the sort of container that can be used:

If you want to store more than 30 litres at home, you must contact the Petroleum Enforcement Authority.

Can you store diesel indoors?

OSHA standards limit the amount of diesel fuel that can be stored in a single storage chamber to 60 gallons. Furthermore, the gasoline must be transferred in a ventilated environment using permitted techniques, such as from the top of the interior tank, through closed pipes, or through a self-closing valve.

Does diesel fuel go stale?

It’s an age-old question for diesel truck drivers and anyone else who drives a diesel-powered vehicle. ‘Does diesel fuel have a shelf life?’ In actuality, there is no such thing as an expiration date for diesel, but the longer you store it, the worse it performs.

In reality, keeping diesel without properly treating it can cause a slew of problems, not just for the fuel but also for any vehicle into which you chose to put it later. We’ll go over exactly what happens to untreated diesel fuel when it’s stored for a long period, as well as how you may avoid these bad consequences by simply treating the diesel before it’s stored.

Diesel fuel’s performance deteriorates when it sits in storage for extended periods of time. When the fuel reaches the final stages of the process, we call it “diesel fuel gone bad.” It may be too late to save your stored diesel fuel if you notice these things occurring to it. However, there are a few things you can do to extend its life, which we’ll go into later.

  • As a result of being exposed to environmental variables, chain reactions occur: Light, water, and heat are the most prevalent environmental variables that have a negative impact on diesel fuel. If the diesel fuel is stored in a location where any of these things might affect it, the molecules in the fuel will produce chain reactions that will cause the fuel to slowly but steadily change from an oil to a varnish.
  • The gasoline darkens, and the gums get swollen: As a result of the chain reactions that occur between environmental variables and the molecules of diesel fuel, the fuel thickens and darkens, turning into more of a gum or sludge.

This process alters the molecular structure of diesel fuel, and because most modern diesel fuels do not contain the same amount of sulfur as older diesel fuels, bacteria begin to thrive in the fuel, forming biomass. This can result in acids that completely degrade the fuel over time.

  • The sludgy fuel won’t burn properly, resulting in black smoke: This thicker, darker dieselfuel won’t run as smoothly as a diesel fuel that hasn’t been influenced by external factors, resulting in black smoke and engine sputtering, which is never good for your car.
  • Internal vehicle damage due to lubricity: Because this diesel fuel no longer has the lubricity it once did, the acidic nature and thickness of the fuel will begin to negatively affect the fuel pump, diesel injectors, and engine, and you may not be able to start your engine if the problem is severe enough.

You may be wondering if there is any solution that will allow you to keep diesel fuel without it becoming a sludgy mess now that you know what it means when you hear it has gone bad.

The solution is significantly more straightforward than you might have assumed. You can ensure that your stored diesel fuel is safe at all times by using a diesel fuel stabilizer. Although there are numerous brands and formulations to pick from, we recommend Opti-Lube, which is the world’s #1 rated additive that more than doubles the shelf life of diesel fuel.

Despite the fact that diesel fuel does not have a specific expiration date, the performance of stored fuel might be harmed over time if improper storage and additives are not used. If you intend on storing fuel or not driving your truck over the winter, it’s important to use a reliable additive like Opti-Lube and take precautions before it’s too late.

We at Gem State Diesel understand the damage that gummed-up diesel fuel can cause to a vehicle, which is why we’ve decided to offer this knowledge and show you how we maintain our fuel working at its best no matter what. After all, it’s always better to be cautious than sorry, especially when dealing with something as precious and impressive as a diesel engine.