How Long Does Diesel Fuel Stay Good?

In temperatures of 85 degrees, diesel fuel can last for 6 to 12 months. The fuel will then start to react with the oxygen in the tank. Diesel may become sticky as a result of this interaction. If diesel turns sticky, it can block fuel filters, causing engine problems. The sticky fuel will not burn properly, resulting in a film of soot and carbon on the engine’s inside. One possibility is to apply oxidation-resisting stability treatments.

Degradation of diesel fuel can also be caused by other sources. Fungus can grow in the presence of water in the fuel. Fungi can produce organic chemicals that break down diesel molecules. The gumming process can be accelerated by high temperatures. When metals like zinc and copper come into contact with diesel fuel, they can trigger a chemical reaction. Certain chemicals have been shown to hasten the aging process.

Is 10 year old diesel fuel still good?

It’s an age-old question for diesel truck drivers and anyone else who drives a diesel-powered vehicle. ‘Does diesel fuel have a shelf life?’ In actuality, there is no such thing as an expiration date for diesel, but the longer you store it, the worse it performs.

In reality, keeping diesel without properly treating it can cause a slew of problems, not just for the fuel but also for any vehicle into which you chose to put it later. We’ll go over exactly what happens to untreated diesel fuel when it’s stored for a long period, as well as how you may avoid these bad consequences by simply treating the diesel before it’s stored.

Diesel fuel’s performance deteriorates when it sits in storage for extended periods of time. When the fuel reaches the final stages of the process, we call it “diesel fuel gone bad.” It may be too late to save your stored diesel fuel if you notice these things occurring to it. However, there are a few things you can do to extend its life, which we’ll go into later.

  • As a result of being exposed to environmental variables, chain reactions occur: Light, water, and heat are the most prevalent environmental variables that have a negative impact on diesel fuel. If the diesel fuel is stored in a location where any of these things might affect it, the molecules in the fuel will produce chain reactions that will cause the fuel to slowly but steadily change from an oil to a varnish.
  • The gasoline darkens, and the gums get swollen: As a result of the chain reactions that occur between environmental variables and the molecules of diesel fuel, the fuel thickens and darkens, turning into more of a gum or sludge.

This process alters the molecular structure of diesel fuel, and because most modern diesel fuels do not contain the same amount of sulfur as older diesel fuels, bacteria begin to thrive in the fuel, forming biomass. This can result in acids that completely degrade the fuel over time.

  • The sludgy fuel won’t burn properly, resulting in black smoke: This thicker, darker dieselfuel won’t run as smoothly as a diesel fuel that hasn’t been influenced by external factors, resulting in black smoke and engine sputtering, which is never good for your car.
  • Internal vehicle damage due to lubricity: Because this diesel fuel no longer has the lubricity it once did, the acidic nature and thickness of the fuel will begin to negatively affect the fuel pump, diesel injectors, and engine, and you may not be able to start your engine if the problem is severe enough.

You may be wondering if there is any solution that will allow you to keep diesel fuel without it becoming a sludgy mess now that you know what it means when you hear it has gone bad.

The solution is significantly more straightforward than you might have assumed. You can ensure that your stored diesel fuel is safe at all times by using a diesel fuel stabilizer. Although there are numerous brands and formulations to pick from, we recommend Opti-Lube, which is the world’s #1 rated additive that more than doubles the shelf life of diesel fuel.

Despite the fact that diesel fuel does not have a specific expiration date, the performance of stored fuel might be harmed over time if improper storage and additives are not used. If you intend on storing fuel or not driving your truck over the winter, it’s important to use a reliable additive like Opti-Lube and take precautions before it’s too late.

We at Gem State Diesel understand the damage that gummed-up diesel fuel can cause to a vehicle, which is why we’ve decided to offer this knowledge and show you how we maintain our fuel working at its best no matter what. After all, it’s always better to be cautious than sorry, especially when dealing with something as precious and impressive as a diesel engine.

How long can diesel fuel sit before it goes bad?

There are two issues here. First, because diesel fuel is a carbon-based petrochemical, it begins to oxidize as soon as it leaves the refinery, forming the sediments and gums that choke fuel. So, how long will a gallon of diesel fuel last? Without diesel fuel additives, diesel can go bad in as little as 30 days, causing deposits that can harm fuel injectors, fuel lines, and other system components, reducing fuel economy and performance.

Water is a significant issue in diesel fuel for several reasons. One is that new diesel mixes frequently include biodiesel, which has a higher water content by nature. If the water isn’t separated from the fuel, it can make its way into the fuel injectors. Pressures of up to (40,000) PSI are used in newer common rail fuel systems. If even a single droplet of water makes its way to the fuel injector through one of the new high-pressure systems, it can blow the tip-off, which is an expensive repair. This slime, like oxidation, can clog the fuel and cause long-term damage.

You can reduce the amount of water in your tank by keeping it full, which reduces the amount of condensation area in the tank and thus the amount of water. Second, diesel fuel treatments that demulsify or separate water from the fuel are available. A Fuel Water Separator (FWS) filter is found in almost all diesel engines. The performance of the body is improved by demulsification (FWS). All OEM manufacturers recommend demulsifying diesel fuel to ensure that water may be properly removed without causing damage to your engine. For fuel storage tanks, standard good fuel maintenance standards must be followed. These procedures entail the removal of water that has accumulated at the tank’s bottom on a regular basis. Because water is heavier than fuel, it will sink to the bottom, where it will be safer than in your fuel system. To avoid microbial growth, maintenance dosages of a dual phased (works in both water and fuel phases) biocide should be applied twice a year.

Does diesel go bad after 5 years?

Diesel normally lasts six to twelve months at temperatures over 30 degrees Celsius. When oxygen reacts with the fuel, silt and gum accumulate over time, so make sure there’s as little air in the tank as possible when filling it up. Expired or ‘rotten’ diesel produces less power and can cause soot build-up in engine parts, causing damage to your car, mower, or truck. 5

Diesel, like gasoline, has an expiration date. It’s critical to store diesel fuel in a container that keeps heat, water, and air out, as this can hasten the expiration process. Diesel can last up to twelve months in ideal conditions, but you can extend its life even further by using a diesel fuel stabilizer. 6

What can I do with old diesel?

Because diesel gasoline is a flammable and toxic waste, there are a few precautions you should take before discarding it.

It should never be flushed down the toilet or thrown away in a garbage container or recycling bin.

This can corrode your pipelines, pollute ground and drinking water, and put your waste collectors’ health at danger.

Dumping diesel gasoline into a river, lake, pond, sewer, canal, or any other body of water is unlawful. It’s also against the law to dump it in a landfill.

So, whether you’re trying to get rid of an old vehicle with diesel fuel remaining in the tank or an old container in your garage that may have been contaminated with water or another unknown substance, you must dispose of it as hazardous waste.

Step # 1: Know What You Possess

To be safe, treat your diesel fuel as hazardous waste if you suspect it has been polluted by water or another unknown contaminant.

Step # 2: Try to Use the Diesel Fuel

If it’s in your vehicle, use a siphon to transfer it to a container and preserve it for later use. If you have another vehicle or piece of machinery that can run on diesel fuel, such as a generator, try to use it to avoid wasting it.

Step # 3: Ask If Someone around You Wants the Fuel

Inquire with anyone in your immediate vicinity whether they would be willing to take the fuel off your hands. Many folks would gladly accept free gasoline in exchange for rushing over to meet you.

See whether a trucker, commercial fisherman, or construction company you know might be willing to buy diesel fuel from you. Only do this if you’re very certain your fuel isn’t tainted.

Step # 4: Contact Hazardous Waste Collectors

Contact hazardous waste collectors or municipal recycling centers in your area for the cleanest way to dispose of diesel fuel. In the last six years, the hazardous waste collection sector in the United States has developed significantly.

Almost all local trash firms have hazardous waste collection programs, or will be able to contact you with such collectors who would take your diesel fuel and properly dispose of it.

Some hazardous waste collectors may charge a minor disposal fee for diesel fuel, but keep in mind that the cost will be significantly less than the possible damage caused by illegal diesel fuel disposal.

Step # 5: Drop It Off at a Fire Hall

For training purposes, fire services utilize diesel fuel to start a fire. It is filtered and reused. Contact your local fire department to ask if they’d be interested in taking your uncontaminated diesel fuel.

You can also drop it off in a spill-proof container at several fire halls that have a local collection point.

Step # 6: Dispose of the Fuel in the Landfill in Spill-Proof Containers

Drive over to your city’s landfill to see whether they accept diesel fuel. Most landfills can take up to 5 gallons of diesel fuel in spill-proof containers that are clearly labeled as hazardous trash.

Hazardous waste disposal may be subject to fees at some landfills. The expense, however, will be less than the damage caused by improper disposal.

Is 2 year old gasoline still good?

If you haven’t driven your car in a while, you may be wondering if the gas in the tank is still OK or if it has to be removed and replaced with new gas. Here’s the answer to your question.

Is old gas in the tank bad for your car? The quick answer

In almost all cases, aging gas isn’t a problem. Gas that sits for a long time deteriorates. Gas that has been sitting for a few months, on the other hand, can be redeemed by topping off the tank with new gas. The motor will work properly once the new gas has mixed with the old gas. “The fresh gas will mix with what’s already in your tank,” explains Consumer Reports’ chief mechanic John Ibbotson, “and any fluctuation in the octane will be corrected for automatically by your car’s engine computer.” The change will restore the engine’s regular operation.

What happens when gas gets old?

When gas sits for a long time, it begins to degrade in a number of ways. Gas will lose octane over time. The combustible component of gasoline is octane. The better the air-fuel mixture and combustion in the cylinders, the higher the octane rating (think 87, 89, 93).

As gas ages, it reduces its volatility, or how explosive it is. Engine performance suffers when volatility reduces. As the engine and gas rest, residues and water from gas combustion might build up. None of this is encouraging for engine performance.

How old is too old for gas?

Degradation begins right once, but most gas remains usable for at least a month. Gas that is more than two months old, on the other hand, is generally safe to use with just small performance reductions. Engine knocking, sputtering, and clogged injectors can all be symptoms of gas that has been sitting for more than a year. To avoid engine damage, bad gas can be evacuated from the tank. One thing to bear in mind is that you can’t tell how old the gas is when you first put it in your automobile.

Can I use old diesel fuel?

It’s unlikely to take as long as you imagine. After you put fuel in a container, it only takes a few months for the quality to deteriorate — much less if the fuel is tainted in any way.

Petrol has a six-month shelf life when stored in a sealed container at 20 degrees Fahrenheit, and just three months when stored at 30 degrees Fahrenheit. The more heat it is subjected to, the faster it will blow up.

You’ll be able to maintain the container for even shorter time if it’s not well sealed, and there’ll be an elevated fire risk owing to combustible vapours escaping.

Diesel, on the other hand, can be utilized for six to twelve months before becoming ‘gummy,’ which can clog filters and cause engine problems if used.

Can bad diesel ruin your engine?

Is It Possible For Bad Diesel To Ruin Your Engine? Hard Particulate Causes Particulate Damage Moving parts in the fuel system are damaged by hard particles, causing them to malfunction. Starting difficulty, poor engine performance, idling problems, and full engine failure are all possible outcomes.

Can you get a bad batch of diesel?

Do you ever consider what you’re putting in your tank? Probably not, other from fretting about the price and which fuel grade to purchase. You should, however.

A faulty batch of fuel may wreak havoc on both diesel and petrol engines, particularly common rail diesel engines, resulting in thousands of dollars in repair costs.