How Long Will Off Road Diesel Last?

On-road diesel is either clear or somewhat green in appearance. When diesel fuel is freshly dispensed into a bottle to observe its color, refineries add a green dye, which is visible. This dye fades to yellow or darker colors as the fuel ages. Checking the fuel for a “bright” appearance, with the faint green dye being a giveaway that the diesel is new and in good condition, is part of a visual inspection to assess diesel fuel quality.

What is dyed diesel?

Diesel contains dye in almost all of it. When we talk about dyed diesel, we usually mean a red dye applied to off-road diesel. Off-road diesel is typically used for heating oil, construction fueling, agricultural use, and other off-road equipment not needed to pay fuel taxes on the highway system.

What is farm diesel?

Off-road diesel, often known as farm diesel or diesel for agricultural purposes, is diesel that is not subject to on-road fuel taxes. Diesel fuel used for agricultural purposes is tax-free. Taxes can be avoided if diesel is burned on a farm and can be tracked. In Oregon, farms are able to obtain clear diesel without paying any road fees. It is frequently coloured red to indicate that it is tax-free. Some farms may track their use of clear diesel so they can submit for Federal road taxes for off-road usage in Oregon, where P.U.C. for trucks over 26,000 GVW pay a weight mile tax instead of a per gallon state road tax.

What color is dyed diesel?

Every gallon of fuel sold in the United States contains some color. Diesel for on-road use usually has a slight green hue. This is a dye that is mixed into the fuel by either the refiner or the terminal supplier. Off-road diesels are coloured red to indicate that the fuel is tax-free and intended only for off-road use.

Why is diesel dyed?

Diesel is coloured to indicate whether or not it has paid road tax. In the United States, on-road diesel usually has a faint green hue. Off-road diesel is dyed red to indicate that it has not paid the required road taxes in all states and by the federal government.

What is off-road diesel?

Off-road diesel is diesel fuel that has been dyed red to indicate that it is tax-free and only available for off-road fuel uses such as construction fueling, equipment that is never used on a public road, agricultural use, heating oil, boiler fuel, and other non-taxed diesel fuel uses as defined by state and federal fuel tax laws. Some off-road users in Oregon can use the Oregon state tax exemption to buy on-road fuel if they have the correct papers.

Is dyed or off-road diesel flammable?

The National Fire Code classifies off-road diesel as a Class II combustible liquid. A flammable fuel has a flash point below 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The flash point of diesel ranges between 126 and 205 degrees Fahrenheit (typically assumed to be about 160 degrees F). As a result, it’s classified as a Class II combustible.

Is off-road diesel or dyed diesel high sulfur diesel?

Dyed diesel (also known as off-road diesel) contains a lot of sulfur. Diesel fuel having a sulfur level of more than 500 parts per million is known as high sulfur diesel.

Is off-road diesel or dyed diesel ultra-low sulfur diesel?

Off-road and colored diesel fuels may have ultra-low sulfur, however this is not always the case. In the United States, there has been a persistent campaign to reduce sulfur in all fuels, led by EPA regulation. Off-road construction and agricultural equipment have been required by EPA rules in recent years to have an emissions system that allows ultra-low sulfur to function without serious difficulties. As a result, today’s off-road diesel is ultra-low sulfur. If you have a tank with old dyed red diesel fuel in it, you can infer it has a sulfur concentration that is higher than ultra-low.

What is dyed ULSD fuel?

Dyed ULSD fuel is ultra-low sulfur diesel that has been dyed red to indicate that it is only intended for off-road or untaxed use. Heating oil, construction fuel, agricultural fuel, generator fuel, and other off-road uses are common uses for this type of fuel. The abbreviation “ULSD” stands for ultra-low sulfur diesel.

Is dyed diesel #1 or # 2 diesel?

Diesel that has been dyed can be either #1 or #2 diesel. Both fuels must include a red dye to prove that they are untaxed and cannot be utilized as on-road fuels.

Why does the government require diesel be dyed red?

“For two reasons, the federal government demands dyeing of untaxed diesel fuel and kerosene. To aid in the reduction of tax fraud by recognizing fuel that hasn’t paid excise taxes and to aid in the reduction of air pollution by identifying fuel that isn’t acceptable for use in highway vehicles.”

Is dyed diesel and off-road diesel kerosene?

Kerosene (which crosses as #1 diesel fuel) can be found in dyed diesel and off-road diesel, but it is not always the case. Do not mistake a dyed fuel for kerosene, which is a more uncommon fuel. Kerosene differs from #1 diesel in one way: it has been proven that it may be absorbed and taken up by a wick. All kerosene is classified as #1 diesel. Kerosene isn’t found in all #1 diesel fuels. Diesels that have been colored and off-road fuels are in the same boat. All coloured kerosene and off-road diesel are dyed. Kerosene isn’t the only coloured fuel.

Is dyed diesel and off-road diesel stove oil?

Stove oil is coloured diesel and off-road diesel. Similar to diesel, it’s usually a #1 or #2 stove oil. Stove oils, as opposed to diesel, had a slightly distinct set of specification problems in the past, which is why they were named “stove oils.” It was less precise when petroleum refineries distilled crude oils to make diesel range fuels than it is now with hydrocracking technology. The number of distillate range fuel requirements is significantly more concentrated today, thanks to both oil refinery technologies and EPA emission standards, in order to assure compliance with EPA and state rules. If your heating appliance requires stove oil, it will most likely require #1 stove oil or #1 kerosene. This product is supposed to produce less soot, making it better suited for use in a pot stove. Monitor and Toyostove thermostatically controlled direct vent heaters are the most current stove oil appliances in the United States.

Is off-road diesel bad for my truck?

It depends on the year of your truck, and we’re assuming you’re talking about red diesel fuel. To begin, it is illegal to use dyed diesel, off-road diesel, or heating oil in an on-road vehicle. If you are found in Oregon, you might face a punishment of up to $10,000, and the state is very aggressive in pursuing tax evasion. Beyond the usage of off-road fuel, which is legal. On the west coast, coloured diesel is often ultra low sulfur fuel. This means that if it’s burned in your engine, it won’t cause any problems. It may be high sulfur or low sulfur fuel, depending on the age of the colored fuel or whether it is genuinely a heating oil. If you use that fuel in a post-2007 engine with a particle trap, you’ll have major maintenance problems.

Is dyed diesel or off-road diesel heating oil?

Yes, colored diesel and off-road fuel can be used to heat your home. These days, most dyed diesel and off-road diesel is ultra-low sulfur diesel. According to the EPA and most state rules, heating oil can have a low or high sulfur concentration. So, while heating oil cannot always be colored diesel (when used for off-road machinery or agricultural purposes), dyed/off-road diesel can always be used for heating oil and meet the requirements of heating oil furnaces.

Does off-road diesel freeze?

At low temperatures, off-road diesel gels. Wax crystals form and fall out of the diesel at lower temperatures, clogging filters and gelling the fuel. Water and naturally held-in diesel will also ice up, clogging filters. Diesel gelling is the term for this phenomena.

Does off-road diesel gel in cold weather?

If it gets cold enough, all diesel fuels will gel. Wax crystals and ice accumulating in your fuel will clog filters and cause your equipment to shut down. As a rule of thumb, if you don’t treat your diesel fuel, it should work OK above 20 degrees F. If the temperature drops below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, make sure your vendor treats the fuel for winter use so it can operate at -20 degrees Fahrenheit. If you’re going to be operating in temps below that, check with your vendor to see if they’ve tested the fuel to work in temperatures below -20 degrees F.

Does off-road diesel go bad?

Off-road and dyed diesel might deteriorate with time. All ASTM-compliant diesel fuels should be safe to store for up to a year without extra treatment or testing. If you’re storing diesel for a long time, it’s a good idea to treat it with a biocide and an oxidative stabilizer to guarantee that it stays within specifications and that nothing grows in your fuel tank. Water and dirt entering the fuel through a tank vent is the worst opponent of long-term diesel storage. A tank will breathe when the temperature changes, bringing in air and moisture from the outside. Keeping your gasoline within specification means making sure there’s no water in the tank and that no outside impurities can get in.

How long can I store off-road or dyed diesel in a fuel tank?

Diesel fuel has a one-year shelf life if left untreated. You can anticipate diesel to last two to three years if it is treated with a biocide to prevent biological development in the tank. When diesel is sampled after two to three years, it loses its brightness and begins to exhibit signs of age. After three years, you’ll want to sample and test the fuel to make sure it’s up to code and safe to use.

What is the difference between off-road diesel and on-road diesel?

The significant difference between the two fuels is the amount of gasoline taxes levied. To indicate that it is both ultra-low sulfur diesel and that the on-road fuel taxes associated with using it to power a highway vehicle have been paid, all on-road diesel is transparent or greenish in color. Fuel that has been dyed has not been taxed and cannot be used to power a vehicle on a public road.

Do you pay sales tax on dyed diesel or off-road diesel in Washington state?

Yes. The sales tax is assessed if you consume colored diesel and do not pay the on-road fuel taxes in Washington state. The sales tax is not paid if you use clear fuel with road taxes connected to it. The Washington Department of Revenue has more information about Washington gasoline taxes.

What are the taxes on dyed diesel or off-road diesel in Oregon state?

Your gasoline distributor pays a modest tax (less than $.01) on the fuel they purchase at the wholesale terminal. The US EPA Superfund cleanup and the “LUST” (Leaking Underground Storage Tank Cleanup Fund) are two of the taxes. Aside from that, there are no taxes on off-road diesel fuel in Oregon (federal, state, or local municipality).

Is there a way to buy clear diesel without a road tax on it?

In Oregon, you can purchase clear fuel that is exempt from state road charges. The following are the requirements for using clear diesel in Oregon without paying state taxes:

  • cars with a legal Oregon “E” plate and registered to a US government agency, an Oregon state agency, or an Oregon county or city
  • Vehicles or farm tractors/equipment that are only used on the roadway inadvertently, as specified in ORS 319.520
  • Unlicensed vehicles or equipment that are utilized exclusively on privately owned property

What happens if I use dyed diesel in an on-road vehicle?

If you are caught in Oregon, you might be fined $10,000 each day. We’ve seen fuel tax evaders nabbed before, so be advised that Oregon is looking for any amount of dye in an on-road vehicle’s saddle tank. You will have maintenance concerns with your vehicle’s emission system if you use low sulfur or high sulfur fuel and your vehicle has a particulate trap.

Can you use dyed diesel in a diesel pickup truck?

Only if the pickup is solely for off-roading. If you plan to utilize that truck on a public road (even to cross a street) and colored fuel is discovered in it, state regulators can (and do) levy fines of up to $10,000 per occurrence. You can use off-road diesel as the vehicle’s fuel if you have a closed facility or a large farm and are not registering the vehicle for on-road use (thus the pickup must not leave the site). Any regulator observing dyed fuel in your vehicle will assume it’s an on-road pickup if you have license plates and it’s approved for on-road use.

How does the government test if someone used dyed diesel?

Typically, regulators may take a sample from the tank or spin the gasoline filter to look for obvious dyed fuel when checking for illegal usage of dyed fuel. If the fuel is clear (or even slightly pink) and they suspect dyed fuel was used in the car, they can use a special black light to show that dyed fuel was in touch with the vehicle. They’ll beam the light on the gasoline filter, the fuel tanks, and other portions of the engine compartment that may have come into contact with the fuel. They will cite the vehicle operator if they detect even a minor trace of the red-dye used in off-road fuel in specific regions. On the internet, there are kits for filtering dye out of gasoline to eliminate the color. Those kits won’t be able to remove enough dye to keep these lights from detecting it.

Why is off road diesel illegal for pick up trucks to use?

Off-road diesel is painted red to indicate that on-road fuel taxes have not been paid or that the fuel is tax-free. Fuel taxes for on-road fuel usage are levied by the federal government and state governments to help pay for the roads we all use. Fuel taxes are deductible if you use diesel for non-road equipment, machinery, or heating/boiler uses, and the fuel is coloured to make its tax-free status obvious. In a roadside or site level inspection, regulators can also shine a black light on certain parts of a vehicle’s system to see if colored gasoline is being used illegally.

What is the difference between dyed diesel and heating oil?

What’s going on in the Pacific Northwest right now? Typically, nothing. Diesel-colored heating oil is used. To reduce the overall cost of the fuel, most petroleum distributors sell the mainstream colored diesel grade for use as heating oil. Heating oil and dyed diesel have varied ASTM requirements depending on where you acquire it. Because furnaces and boilers can manage dirtier, lower-quality fuels than off-road equipment with a particle trap, heating oil specifications have larger tolerances than diesel criteria. Although heating oil is always a diesel fuel, dyed diesel for off-road machinery may have a distinct specification. In Oregon, for example, any dyed diesel fuel used in off-road equipment must include at least 5% biodiesel or renewable diesel. Heating oil and boilers are excluded from the biofuel mandate. Heating oil, on the other hand, can be free of biodiesel, while off-road diesel for machinery cannot.

Can refrigerated trailers or “reefers” use dyed diesel even if they are attached to a truck moving it on the highway?

Refrigerated trailers are, in fact, off-road vehicles. Because its engine is not pushing something along the road, the diesel-fueled refrigeration trailer is considered off-road equipment. Any ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel can be used in these trailers (dyed or clear). If you use on-road clear fuel in a refrigerated trailer and keep track and verification of the on-road fuel used in the off-road piece of equipment, you can get your fuel taxes returned. However, proof is required, so speak with your CPA or accountant.

Is off-road diesel better?

Off-road diesel is less expensive than on-road diesel since it is not utilized in vehicles that go on roadways. An excise tax is levied on on-road diesel.

Although there is no performance difference between the two forms of diesel, off-road diesel is less expensive for enterprises who operate off-road vehicles. You can use on-road diesel in off-road vehicles, but you’ll be paying state and federal taxes on the gasoline that you don’t need to.

How long does it take diesel to go bad?

There are two issues here. First, because diesel fuel is a carbon-based petrochemical, it begins to oxidize as soon as it leaves the refinery, forming the sediments and gums that choke fuel. So, how long will a gallon of diesel fuel last? Without diesel fuel additives, diesel can go bad in as little as 30 days, causing deposits that can harm fuel injectors, fuel lines, and other system components, reducing fuel economy and performance.

Water is a significant issue in diesel fuel for several reasons. One is that new diesel mixes frequently include biodiesel, which has a higher water content by nature. If the water isn’t separated from the fuel, it can make its way into the fuel injectors. Pressures of up to (40,000) PSI are used in newer common rail fuel systems. If even a single droplet of water makes its way to the fuel injector through one of the new high-pressure systems, it can blow the tip-off, which is an expensive repair. This slime, like oxidation, can clog the fuel and cause long-term damage.

You can reduce the amount of water in your tank by keeping it full, which reduces the amount of condensation area in the tank and thus the amount of water. Second, diesel fuel treatments that demulsify or separate water from the fuel are available. A Fuel Water Separator (FWS) filter is found in almost all diesel engines. The performance of the body is improved by demulsification (FWS). All OEM manufacturers recommend demulsifying diesel fuel to ensure that water may be properly removed without causing damage to your engine. For fuel storage tanks, standard good fuel maintenance standards must be followed. These procedures entail the removal of water that has accumulated at the tank’s bottom on a regular basis. Because water is heavier than fuel, it will sink to the bottom, where it will be safer than in your fuel system. To avoid microbial growth, maintenance dosages of a dual phased (works in both water and fuel phases) biocide should be applied twice a year.

How long does farm diesel last?

In temperatures of 85 degrees, diesel fuel can last for 6 to 12 months. The fuel will then start to react with the oxygen in the tank. Diesel may become sticky as a result of this interaction. If diesel turns sticky, it can block fuel filters, causing engine problems. The sticky fuel will not burn properly, resulting in a film of soot and carbon on the engine’s inside. One possibility is to apply oxidation-resisting stability treatments.

Degradation of diesel fuel can also be caused by other sources. Fungus can grow in the presence of water in the fuel. Fungi can produce organic chemicals that break down diesel molecules. The gumming process can be accelerated by high temperatures. When metals like zinc and copper come into contact with diesel fuel, they can trigger a chemical reaction. Certain chemicals have been shown to hasten the aging process.

How long does Green diesel stay in tank?

It can last up to 6 months in the system. The exaust might be swabbed and/or the tank dipped by customs.

A fine of exceeding €1000 is imposed on you. This is the first offense. They can remove your car, jeep, or van if you commit a second offense, and you must pay any outstanding taxes or other fees owed on the vehicle.

But seriously, fill the tank to the gunnells, leave it alone until the light comes on, and then refill it to the brim. That should get rid of it.

Can you mix off-road diesel with regular diesel?

No, your truck will be alright on this diesel. The main variation is in color, not in the components. It’s strictly for off-road use, as indicated by the red colour. It’s coloured red to make it visible to government officers if you’re using it illegally. Be aware that if you’re discovered driving on US highways, you could face a ticket and a hefty fine.

Off-road diesel will run your automobile if it runs on diesel. However, as previously said, if you use it illegally and are detected, you will be penalized by both the state and federal governments. Because that is sometimes the only fuel available in the event of a natural disaster, you are unlikely to be penalized.

Technically, you can, because the color is the only difference. We’ve heard of cases where someone bought a truck that ran on off-road diesel and then switched to regular diesel. In that situation, the new owner just switched to regular diesel and the vehicle performed admirably.

The distinguishing red dye is the most noticeable variation, and there may also be a difference in sulfur levels. Furthermore, because this agricultural fuel is designed for heavy machinery, it heats up quickly.

Driving until the tank is completely empty is the simplest way to get rid of the red dye. Then pour in a couple gallons of or normal diesel and let it run for a while. Repeat this process numerous times. If you want to be sure it’s gone, have your repair flush the gasoline system.

No, it isn’t possible. Except for the colour, it’s identical as on-road diesel. If you have a diesel engine, you can use farm fuel to power it. Just make sure you’re not breaking any laws when you use it.

Some people believe it is “tax-free,” but depending on the state, it may or may not be. Here’s a list of states with information on gasoline tax exemptions. When you’re permitted to use this type of fuel off-road, you’ll either pay less at the pump or get a refund on your fuel tax.

You could be charged with “Motor Fuel Tax Evasion” if you’re caught and convicted. Is it really worth it to save money on gas? Here’s what the IRS has to say about it:

“What are the Consequences?” In general, no coloured fuel should be used in highway vehicles. The Internal Revenue Code stipulates a penalty of $1,000 or $10 per gallon, whichever is larger, with payment of the tax for each violation. Additional fines may be imposed by states.”

Mixing the two types of diesel fuels is not a problem, however red diesel has a higher sulfur level than green. It’s also known as green fuel because it’s environmentally beneficial. It’s either light green or transparent in appearance.

This is subject to change. If you’re unsure, you can dip a tube in your tank and pull out a sample to see what color it is; there are also manual dipstick kits and black lights available. However, the gas does not remain in your tank; it passes through your fuel system. If you’re worried, take it to your mechanic to have the system flushed.

What happens to diesel fuel when it gets old?

Gum and sediment form when diesel becomes stale and aged. This reaction occurs as a result of the fuel and oxygen reacting together. This debris clogs the filters, which might cause the engine to stall. Sediment and gum also don’t burn properly, resulting in carbon deposits on the injectors.

Is it bad for a diesel to sit?

There are a number of reasons why your diesel engine may be sitting idle. My truck, for example, is currently parked due to the need for new injectors. Some of you may just have a truck that you don’t use very often, which is fine, but how long can diesel engines sit without harming themselves?

Diesel engines are built to run continuously for lengthy periods of time. Diesels are extremely reliable due to their large internal components and low redline RPM, but how long can these overbuilt powerhouses stay idle? To keep everything moving and the seals from drying out, any engine, whether gas or diesel, should be started and brought up to working temperature at least once or twice a month. It’s even better if you can start your diesel engine once a week. Another reason to run it on a frequent basis is to maintain the fuel supply fresh. Old diesel gasoline can gel and cause a huge mess as well as a headache. If you’re going to be keeping your diesel for an extended amount of time, it’s a good idea to add a Fuel Stabilizer Additive beforehand to avoid any problems. Always remember that the engine should be brought up to working temperature before being turned off, not just started for a minute and then turned off. Short-term operation of diesel engines is not recommended.

What, on the other hand, would or could happen if a diesel engine was left idle for an extended period of time? How serious could the consequences of simply sitting be? You might be surprised by the answer!

Consider a diesel engine as if it were your body. What happens to a body that isn’t kept in good shape and doesn’t move on a regular basis? It starts to decay, and it does so quickly. The same is true for engines; they, too, require frequent use and maintenance. Otherwise, they will get disorganized and lose a lot of value.

Let’s pretend we’ve let an engine idle for a long time. What is the absolute worst that might happen to it? To begin with, all fluids such as oil, coolant, and diesel fuel will degrade and break down. Everything in their environment is affected when this happens. Blockages, corrosion, and outright failure of some components, such as fuel injectors, are caused by the disorganized fluids, which are extremely sensitive to the gasoline that goes through them.

Aside from the fluids breaking down and causing damage, internal components will begin to corrode, which, if left unattended, will leave the engine unworkable. At this point, digging into the engine and replacing the necessary parts to get it functioning again would necessitate the assistance of a mechanic.

What else is there to say? I’m glad you inquired. Dry rot will occur in all rubber hoses, seals, and gaskets, producing leaks. It could also simply weaken them to the point that, when the engine is started and the coolant system creates pressure, the hoses rupture while driving, leaving you stranded.

That’s only a sample of what can go wrong with the engine. Not to mention the fact that all of this sitting takes a toll on the car itself. First, the battery will fail and become unusable, necessitating a jump start or battery replacement. Not to mention the fact that rubber tires have a memory, causing a flat area in the tire that prevents it from being precisely round and balanced.

As you can see, practically every aspect of an engine is harmed when it is ignored and lonely for lengthy periods of time. So, do yourself a favor and start your truck, automobile, tractor, or other vehicle at least once a month. In the long run, it will save you a lot of money and time.

So you’ve been sitting with your truck for years, unused. Or perhaps you’ve recently purchased a diesel project that you want to fix up and get going. Although some damage will almost certainly have occurred, there are actions you may take to ensure that no further parts or components are harmed. What should you do now to make sure you don’t do any more harm than you already have?

Flush the Fluids: Begin with the coolant. To use the radiator, simply twist the plug (make sure you have a catch pan of course). Run the engine after using a coolant cleanse kit that connects to a garden hose. Then drain the coolant and replace it with new coolant. Before starting the engine, both the oil and the oil filter should be updated.

Drop and Drain the Fuel Tank: The following step is to drop and drain the fuel tank. Old fuel that has been in the tank for years tends to gum/gel, clogging the fuel system and injectors. A fuel filter is standard on most diesels, and now is an excellent time to replace it with a new one. Now it’s time to refuel the tank with new diesel! It’s also a good idea to mix in a decent fuel system cleanser with the fresh fuel to ensure that the engine runs smoothly.

Last but not least, inspect the entire engine for leaks, damaged hoses, corrosion, frayed wiring, and other issues. Also, take a walk around the vehicle to ensure that the tires and chassis components are in good working order. If everything checks out, it’s time to fire up the engine and enjoy the journey!

Hopefully, I was able to answer all of your questions about how long a diesel could sit without running, as well as any follow-up questions. Please leave a comment if you have any other queries. We answer as quickly as possible. Thank you for taking the time to read this.

What is the longest lasting fuel?

Getting ready for an emergency might be difficult. It’s difficult to maintain emergency supplies fresh and useful when you don’t know when calamity may strike. It’s critical to know which fuels have the greatest shelf life when you prepare and begin to store fuel. It is preferable to use fuels with an unlimited shelf life whenever possible.

What are the fuels with the longest shelf lives? Propane, alcohol, wood, and charcoal are all suitable emergency storage fuels that can be kept indefinitely.

Which fuel has the longest shelf life and will fulfill my demands is the more appropriate question. Consider the following example:

During a power outage, you can use the following fuels to provide emergency alternate heating for your home:

Alternative fuel sources for emergency cooking without electricity include:

Fuel shelf life is just one of the elements to consider when deciding which fuel is ideal for your emergency preparedness. A fundamental aspect should be the ability to safely store the gasoline. To learn the best techniques for storing emergency fuels, go to How to Store Fuels Safely for Emergencies.

If all other parameters are equal, it makes sense to store the fuels that have the longest shelf life and are the most stable in storage. In this piece, we’ll look at the useable life of common fuels that are kept on hand for emergency situations.

Is 10 year old diesel fuel still good?

It’s an age-old question for diesel truck drivers and anyone else who drives a diesel-powered vehicle. ‘Does diesel fuel have a shelf life?’ In actuality, there is no such thing as an expiration date for diesel, but the longer you store it, the worse it performs.

In reality, keeping diesel without properly treating it can cause a slew of problems, not just for the fuel but also for any vehicle into which you chose to put it later. We’ll go over exactly what happens to untreated diesel fuel when it’s stored for a long period, as well as how you may avoid these bad consequences by simply treating the diesel before it’s stored.

Diesel fuel’s performance deteriorates when it sits in storage for extended periods of time. When the fuel reaches the final stages of the process, we call it “diesel fuel gone bad.” It may be too late to save your stored diesel fuel if you notice these things occurring to it. However, there are a few things you can do to extend its life, which we’ll go into later.

  • As a result of being exposed to environmental variables, chain reactions occur: Light, water, and heat are the most prevalent environmental variables that have a negative impact on diesel fuel. If the diesel fuel is stored in a location where any of these things might affect it, the molecules in the fuel will produce chain reactions that will cause the fuel to slowly but steadily change from an oil to a varnish.
  • The gasoline darkens, and the gums get swollen: As a result of the chain reactions that occur between environmental variables and the molecules of diesel fuel, the fuel thickens and darkens, turning into more of a gum or sludge.

This process alters the molecular structure of diesel fuel, and because most modern diesel fuels do not contain the same amount of sulfur as older diesel fuels, bacteria begin to thrive in the fuel, forming biomass. This can result in acids that completely degrade the fuel over time.

  • The sludgy fuel won’t burn properly, resulting in black smoke: This thicker, darker dieselfuel won’t run as smoothly as a diesel fuel that hasn’t been influenced by external factors, resulting in black smoke and engine sputtering, which is never good for your car.
  • Internal vehicle damage due to lubricity: Because this diesel fuel no longer has the lubricity it once did, the acidic nature and thickness of the fuel will begin to negatively affect the fuel pump, diesel injectors, and engine, and you may not be able to start your engine if the problem is severe enough.

You may be wondering if there is any solution that will allow you to keep diesel fuel without it becoming a sludgy mess now that you know what it means when you hear it has gone bad.

The solution is significantly more straightforward than you might have assumed. You can ensure that your stored diesel fuel is safe at all times by using a diesel fuel stabilizer. Although there are numerous brands and formulations to pick from, we recommend Opti-Lube, which is the world’s #1 rated additive that more than doubles the shelf life of diesel fuel.

Despite the fact that diesel fuel does not have a specific expiration date, the performance of stored fuel might be harmed over time if improper storage and additives are not used. If you intend on storing fuel or not driving your truck over the winter, it’s important to use a reliable additive like Opti-Lube and take precautions before it’s too late.

We at Gem State Diesel understand the damage that gummed-up diesel fuel can cause to a vehicle, which is why we’ve decided to offer this knowledge and show you how we maintain our fuel working at its best no matter what. After all, it’s always better to be cautious than sorry, especially when dealing with something as precious and impressive as a diesel engine.