How To Prevent Diesel From Gelling?

One of the best methods to avoid fuel gelling is to keep the fuel from becoming too cold, which you can accomplish by not leaving your car outside in the cold. This technique should work in the winter if you have a heated garage or other form of climate-controlled storage facility for your vehicle. Because the fuel won’t gel while the engine is running, you can still drive the automobile in the cold. If you have to leave it outside for several hours or days at a time, you’ll need to find another technique to keep the fuel from gelling.

At what degree does diesel fuel begin to gel?

  • Gelling: It’s unusual to have a situation where the fuel practically turns to jelly. Gelling happens when the paraffin wax in diesel solidifies due to a drop in temperature, and the fuel’s temperature must be kept below minus 10 degrees F for extended periods of time, such as 48 to 72 hours. When diesel is cold soaked, the paraffin wax in the fuel hardens, giving it a hazy look. At temperatures as high as 32 degrees F, the fuel will begin to cloud, but it will continue to flow. Before the fuel can gel, it must be kept at a very low temperature for an extended period of time. It’s common to hear drivers complain about their fuel gelling up, but this is almost certainly not the issue they’re having. Ice or solidified paraffin wax in the fuel filter is more likely to be the issue. There’s more on that later.
  • Cloud Point: To determine the cloud point of a sample of diesel fuel, which is the temperature at which the naturally present paraffin wax in #2 diesel fuel begins to crystalize, there are prescribed methods. The fuel has a hazy look due to the microscopic particles of suspended hardened wax. Cloud point temperatures for diesel fuel typically vary from -18°F to +20°F, but can reach +40°F depending on a variety of factors connected to the base stock and refining operations. The cloud point of so-called winter diesel fuel (#1 diesel or kerosene) is substantially lower since it contains relatively little paraffin. Fuel distributors will test the product and, if requested, may include the results in tenders and delivery receipts.
  • The temperature at which a liquid loses its flow properties is known as the pour point. The pour point of diesel fuel changes according on the wax content in the fuel, which varies depending on the source of the base stock, the refining process, and the type and quantity of additives added to the fuel during refining or distribution. The difference between the cloud point and the pour point is always there, with the latter often being 2° to 20°F lower than the former. To establish the pour point of a fuel sample, certain tests must be performed. Bulk providers, as previously stated, can supply this information.
  • When diesel fuel is cooled, the cold filter plugging point is a measurement based on a standardized test that indicates the rate at which it will flow through a standardized filtration equipment in a given amount of time. The CFPP is the point at which the sample fails to pass through the filter in the time allotted.

Can you add gasoline to diesel to prevent gelling?

Get in your gas pickup and head north to a truckstop to purchase anti-gel or #1 fuel. However, do not add gasoline to your fuel system or engine.

Will gelled diesel Ungel?

A variety of things can be put to a gelled tank to aid in the recovery of the fuel to its original state. Opti-Lube Gel Melt and Diesel 911, for example, are made specifically for gelled fuel. Simply fill the tank with one of these and follow the dosing directions. There’s no need to heat or mix the tank. These can take a long time to install, depending on the size and shape of the tank. The treated fuel in the tank may not be able to reach gelled fuel that is not in the tank, such as in fuel lines and filters, which is a significant constraint.

Why does diesel gel up?

Fuel Gelling: What Causes It? Temperature effects on paraffin, a component of diesel fuel, are the most common source of gelling difficulties. When paraffin waxes are burned in an engine, they produce more power. Diesel, on the other hand, will begin to harden as the temperature drops.

Plug in your truck or vehicle

You can use an engine block heater to prevent a diesel vehicle from gelling. These can be installed at your local dealership if your truck doesn’t already have one.

Use winterized diesel.

Some gas stations will have fuel that has been winterized. It may not be available at every pump, so call ahead or inquire at the gasoline counter. They might have a blend that lowers the gelling temperature significantly.

Keep diesel tank as full as possible

Keep more than half a tank of gas in your car. If you’re traveling long distances in places like Wyoming, this could be difficult. With more fuel in the tank, the chance of water/condensation collecting and freezing is reduced. This, in turn, will aid in the prevention of diesel gelling.

Store the vehicle inside

Keep your car in the garage (heated is even better if you have one!) as much as possible. Keeping the vehicle inside, though, may provide just enough of a temperature differential to prevent gelling.

Product Details

In cold temperatures, use to liquefy frozen or gelled diesel gasoline caused by wax production or ice crystals. Quick-Thaw will completely thaw the whole fuel system in roughly 20 minutes if applied according to the guidelines. Excellent for diesel cars operating in colder locations, where wax crystals found in low- and ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels can cause filter blockage.

A bottle of Quick-Thaw should be kept on hand in every diesel truck for emergency cold weather rescue treatment.

Do gas stations add anti gel to diesel fuel?

One of the most significant disadvantages of diesel fuel is that it does not perform well in cold weather. When I say it doesn’t play nice, I mean that the cold can be a pain in the neck. Diesel fuel can create waxy solid crystals that clog gasoline lines and filters when temperatures drop. This not only prevents engines from starting (or from starting and then dying), but it can also necessitate major repairs if things go bad enough.

Will adding kerosene to diesel?

Kerosene burns cleanly in most diesel engines and does not affect them. In reality, kerosene is an acceptable fuel in many contemporary diesel engines. Kerosene is produced through a distillation process, making it a pure fuel. This signifies it doesn’t contain any additives like diesel.

How do I fix my diesel gelling?

If the cold weather catches you off guard, your diesel-powered rig or light vehicle may be difficult to start or not start at all.

This happens because diesel fuel thickens inside filters and fuel lines, clogging your truck’s fuel system by forming a gel. For a truck owner/operator or anyone trying to travel and gets trapped on a dark and lonely highway in the middle of nowhere, this may be a very costly cost. Depending on the severity and location, emergency call outs to defrost a gelled system can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars.

Emergency CleanBoost Diesel Rescue De-GelTM was created with one goal in mind: to get you out of an emergency situation and back on the road as quickly as possible. Continue reading.

Will diesel 911 prevent gelling?

Diesel 911 is a product designed for usage in the winter. To restore the flow of diesel fuel to an engine, our Winter Rescue Formula reliquefies gelled fuel and de-ices frozen fuel-filters. Fuel gelling is not prevented by Diesel 911; instead, use Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost (in the white container) as a preventative precaution. Diesel 911 and Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost are diesel fuel compatible and can be used together.