Is Diesel Environmentally Friendly?

When diesel fuel (refined from crude oil) is used, it emits a variety of hazardous emissions, and diesel-fueled vehicles are major emitters of pollutants like ground-level ozone and particulate matter. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created limits for the sulfur content of diesel fuel and emissions from new diesel engines to address this issue.

Is diesel more environmentally friendly than gasoline?

Although diesel cars get 25 to 35 percent better economy and produce less CO2, they can generate 25 to 400 times more particulate black carbon and related organic matter (“soot”) per kilometer than comparable gasoline cars.

Do diesels pollute more than gas?

Diesel generates somewhat more pollutants per gallon than gasoline, to put it simply. However, as is often the case, the simpler response does not convey the whole story when it comes to diesel vs. gasoline emissions. The truth is that gasoline emits more emissions and pollutes the environment more than diesel.

Nonetheless, when it comes to comparing diesel and gasoline emissions, the simplest response is the best place to start. Standards of measurement and terminology are required to determine even the simplest — albeit inaccurate — answer as to which of the two fossil fuels produces more pollution. When comparing diesel and gasoline emissions, a consistent unit of measurement is needed: gallons. Another required is a definition — a list — of emissions.

Diesel emits a larger amount of emissions per gallon than gasoline, practically without exception. In reality, gasoline pollutes the environment more than diesel. That is also an undeniable fact. “Despite the fact that diesel fuel contains somewhat more carbon (2.68kg CO2/litre) than petrol (2.31kg CO2/litre), overall CO2 emissions from a diesel vehicle are lower. In practice, this amounts to around 200g CO2/km for gasoline and 120g CO2/km for diesel.”

What is the explanation for this? Although a gallon of diesel provides significantly more energy than a gallon of gasoline, the amount of emissions produced by each fuel differs very slightly when burned.

Gasoline produces more emissions per gallon than diesel, but not by much. Determining emissions per gallon, on the other hand, is of little use. The argument that gasoline engines generate fewer pollutants than diesel engines because fewer emissions result per gallon is based on the assumption that the fuel density of both diesel and gasoline is the same.

Arguing that gasoline generates fewer emissions than diesel because diesel emits more emissions per gallon requires that a gallon of diesel and a gallon of gasoline produce the same amount of power and effort. However, this is not the case. The amount of energy produced by a gallon of diesel is significantly greater than that of a gallon of gasoline.

In other words, the amount of gas generated per gallon is not the most essential factor in determining emissions. The ratio of emissions per unit of energy produced is what matters.

To put it another way, if gasoline emits only 3% less emissions per gallon than diesel, yet gasoline only runs an engine 70% as far or for as long as diesel per gallon, gasoline is the greater polluter. “Diesel fuel has about a 10% to 15% higher energy content than gasoline. As a result, diesel vehicles may generally travel 20% to 35% further on a gallon of gas than their gasoline counterparts.”

It is simple to comprehend why gasoline engines damage the environment more than diesel engines in a few simple stages, but a definition of emissions is required before the difference between diesel and gasoline emissions can be determined.

Gases the Combustion of Diesel and Gasoline Emits

When fossil fuels are burned, hundreds of gases are released into the atmosphere. Some, on the other hand, are rather benign in terms of human health and global warming.

Others, on the other hand, are exceedingly poisonous or have a large global warming potential. However, because of the little amount produced during fossil fuel combustion, many hazardous and harmful gases are not worth much worry. Because the number is so small, discussing these gases just serves to obscure the issue when it comes to actually harmful and dangerous emitting gases.

There are six (6) gases emitted by diesel and gasoline that have a significant impact on global warming, the environment, and human health.

Carbon Dioxide and the Non-Toxic, Benign Greenhouse Gases

When individuals come into contact with automobiles and equipment, there are three main emissions that are harmless. However, these three gases have a significant role in global warming and climate change. Despite the fact that other gases created by human activities have a higher impact on global warming, these are the three most harmful greenhouse gases produced by diesel and gasoline burning.

Carbon dioxide is the most well-known greenhouse gas produced by fossil fuel burning. Carbon dioxide is a naturally occurring gas in the atmosphere. It is a result of non-human activity such as forest fires caused by lightning, volcanic eruptions, and biological emissions from the oceans. Despite this, CO2 is the most significant contributor to global warming among all gases created by human activity.

However, this does not imply that CO2 is the most potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Many other GHGs have a stronger global warming potential than CO2, yet CO2 is the gas produced in the greatest quantities.

Whether nitrogen gas should be considered an emission is a point of contention. Nitrogen makes up 78 percent of the atmosphere’s entire makeup. The majority of nitrogen gas released into the atmosphere as a result of fossil fuel burning is nitrogen gas that previously existed, N2 that was pulled into an engine through the air intake and passed unmodified through the engine.

N2 is still a greenhouse gas. N2 is also a greenhouse gas with a strong potential for global warming. N2 is a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion engines, however in minor levels.

Though it may appear that having water vapor in the air is a beneficial thing, it is a significant contributor to global warming. During burning, the hydrocarbons — hydrogen and carbon chemical molecules — in fossil fuels undergo one of two fundamental chemical changes: conversion to water (hydrogen and oxygen chemical compounds).

Water vapor has a global warming potential XXX times that of carbon dioxide.

Toxic Greenhouse Gases Produced in Large Quantities during Fossil Fuel Combustion

Again, there are a huge number of highly harmful greenhouse gases that are not created in big numbers. There are three, however, that are both poisonous and created in huge quantities during the burning of fossil fuels.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is both a greenhouse gas with potential for global warming and a deadly gas that damages humans and animals. When little amounts of CO are inhaled, it causes headaches and nausea. Large doses can lead to heart attacks and death in both animals and humans.

Carbon monoxide is not a greenhouse gas in the traditional sense. CO, unlike CO2, has a low potential for global warming. CO, on the other hand, interacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and renders them inert. Because they break down greenhouse gases like CO2 and methane, hydroxyl radicals are positive gain agents in the environment.

When CO kills OH radicals, those radicals are no longer able to mitigate the global warming impacts of greenhouse gases with a high global warming potential.

Oxides of nitrogen, such as nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, can cause airway inflammation and other respiratory problems. Furthermore, while nitrogen oxides may not have a great potential for global warming, “NOx gases are involved in the generation of smog and acid rain, as well as fine particles (PM) and ground-level ozone, both of which are linked to negative health impacts.”

Unburned fuel escapes into the atmosphere because no engine can capture 100% of the potential energy in a fossil fuel – that is, no engine can burn all of the fuel that flows through it. Smog is simply unburned gasoline molecules that have been evaporated.

In animals, vaporized volatile organic compounds have been shown to cause cancer, and they are suspected of doing the same in people. HealthLinkBC reports that “VOCs are a group of compounds that can irritate the eyes, nose, and throat, as well as causing headaches, fatigue, nausea, dizziness, and skin problems. At higher quantities, the lungs may become irritated, as well as the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system.

Some VOCs have been shown to cause cancer in animals and are thought to cause cancer in humans. The physiological consequences of VOCs are dependent on the concentration and amount of time spent in contact with the compounds.”

Of course, there are many more greenhouse gases. Methane, for example, is the most powerful greenhouse gas on the planet, accounting for 90 to 98 percent of all natural gas. However, carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, and water vapor have the greatest global warming potential when diesel and gasoline fuels are used. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons are all examples of pollutants.

Emissions Types and Amounts from Diesel and Gasoline Emissions

Without catalytic converters, petroleum-powered engines emit huge amounts of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides. Diesel engines, meanwhile, do not.

Fuel and Emissions Technologies Reduce Emissions Dramatically

Without fuel and emissions technologies, gasoline combustion produces less power, higher pollutants, and more harmful emissions than diesel combustion. That changed with the invention of the catalytic converter. Despite the fact that catalytic converters cut emissions, there is a cost. Vehicles with catalytic converters run less efficiently, consume more gasoline, and emit more CO2.

“The development of catalytic converters, which degrade pollutants like CO to less dangerous gases like CO2, has drastically decreased emissions from gasoline cars.” When compared to petrol automobiles without catalysts, catalyst cars emit significantly less CO, HC, and NOx, at the expense of CO2 emissions, which rise as carbon monoxide is oxidized to CO2.”

Diesel engines, on the other hand, emit modest levels of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides.

No Argument for Favorability of Gasoline Engines Over Diesel with Respect to Emissions

The diesel emissions versus gasoline debate is hardly a debate, especially when considering the technologies that reduce diesel emissions — emissions data for gasoline engine emissions is almost always taken from tests on vehicles with catalytic converters, as catalytic converters are an international requirement for vehicle manufacturers —

Diesel engines are both cleaner and more efficient than gasoline ones.

Why is diesel bad for the environment?

Exposure to diesel pollution can cause major health problems such as asthma and respiratory infections, as well as exacerbate existing heart and lung disease, particularly in youngsters and the elderly. Increased emergency department visits, hospital admissions, absences from work and school, and early deaths can all result from these illnesses.

Diesel engine emissions lead to the formation of ground-level ozone, which harms crops, trees, and other vegetation.

Acid rain is also created, which has an impact on land, lakes, and streams, as well as entering the human food chain through water, produce, meat, and fish.

Property damage and poor vision are also caused by these pollutants.

Climate change has an impact on air and water quality, weather patterns, sea levels, ecosystems, and agriculture around the world. Improved fuel economy and idle reduction methods can help address climate change, improve our nation’s energy security, and build our economy by lowering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from diesel engines.

Environmental Justice – The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) strives to provide equal protection against environmental and health dangers to all individuals, as well as equal access to decision-making, in order to maintain a healthy environment in which to live, learn, and work.

DERA’s efforts support the EPA’s goal of reducing the health and environmental harm caused by diesel emissions in all communities across the country.

Why diesel is better for the environment?

Using diesel fuel minimizes dangerous CO2 emissions that contribute to global warming, according to recent science.

Engines that run on diesel are more efficient than those that run on gasoline. Even though diesel has a higher carbon content than gasoline, efficient diesel engines produce less carbon into the atmosphere.

The difference in CO2 emissions between diesel and gasoline was recently calculated by environmental scientists. In practice, this amounts to around 200g CO2/km for gasoline and 120g CO2/km for diesel. That’s a 40 percent difference!

Consider this: if every car ran on diesel, the world’s CO2 pollution would be reduced by 40%.

Is diesel bad for climate?

While modern generation diesel engines release less carbon dioxide than gasoline engines, they tend to emit more NOx.

These emissions indicate that, in densely populated places, diesel engines are frequently the leading source of roadside air pollution, particularly among older vehicles.

As a result of these emissions, City Hall in London has implemented the T-charge, which targets the oldest and most polluting vehicles on the road.

Diesel car owners face additional taxes in addition to contributing to air pollution as the government attempts to wean the public off the vehicles.

For the first year of ownership, motorists who purchase new diesel vehicles have been subject to a VED tax increase from April 2018. Additional charges on diesel vehicles may be imposed by your local government through parking permits and other road-charging methods.

Is diesel energy renewable?

Green diesel, also known as renewable diesel, is a biofuel that is chemically identical to petroleum diesel fuel. Renewable diesel complies with ASTM D975 for petroleum diesel and can be utilized in existing petroleum pipelines, storage tanks, and diesel engines. It may be made from cellulosic biomass materials such agricultural leftovers, wood and sawdust, and switchgrass, and it meets the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program’s advanced biofuel requirements.

Hydrotreating, gasification, and pyrolysis are some of the thermochemical processes used to make renewable diesel. Learn more about the manufacturing of renewable diesel.

Because renewable diesel is chemically identical to petroleum diesel, it can be used in its purest form (known as R100) or blended with petroleum diesel in the same way as biodiesel is combined. R20 is a 20 percent renewable diesel and 80 percent petroleum diesel blend, whereas R5 is a 5 percent renewable diesel and 95 percent petroleum diesel blend.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the United States publishes data on renewable diesel fuel imports. RFS RIN (renewable identification number) data from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can be used as a proxy for consumption. According to RIN data for 2019, total renewable diesel consumption in the United States was around 900 million gallons. At present moment, the EIA does not publish data on renewable diesel fuel production.

Because of the economic benefits of using renewable diesel produced in the United States and imported renewable diesel under California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard, the state consumes practically all of it.

Is Clean diesel really clean?

Clean diesel contains fewer sulfurs, which means that engines burn the liquid more efficiently and, as long as the engine is intended to be environmentally friendly, damage the environment significantly less than conventional systems. Clean diesel can be used as a normal fuel in TDI and hybrid engines, resulting in significantly less emissions than standard systems. Filters and catalytic converters are typically installed in hybrid and TDI engines to burn off nitrous oxide (or N2O), which is a major source of pollution from diesel engines.

What fuel is better for the environment?

Finally, “which fuel is more environmentally friendly?” Which sort of engine emits the least amount of pollution? As a result, there are fewer harmful emissions.

Diesel is the solution to two of the questions. Diesel fuel emits fewer and less hazardous emissions than gasoline. Diesel engines also have a superior fuel economy. A multitude of reasons are likely to be at play in the disparity.

Why is there a disparity between the number of diesel passenger vehicles in the United States and the rest of the world?

Diesel engines are more efficient than gasoline engines in terms of fuel consumption. Diesel engines emit significantly fewer and less hazardous emissions than gasoline engines. They are more environmentally friendly. So, why do American drivers practically never purchase them?

Does diesel pollute?

When diesel fuel is consumed in an engine, the amount of sulfur in the fuel is directly proportional to the amount of pollutants created. Sulfur levels above a certain threshold increase pollution.

The emissions produced when diesel fuel is consumed in engines contribute to air pollution, which has major human health and environmental consequences.

  • Nitrogen oxides (NOx), which contribute to the formation of smog and acid rain at ground level;

This pollution can lead to heart and lung illness, as well as a variety of other health problems. It also has the potential to harm plants, animals, agriculture, and water supplies.

What are the disadvantages of diesel?

The global market for diesel engines is exploding at previously unheard-of levels. This trend is predicted to last until at least 2025, indicating that this technology will not be phased out anytime soon. It is a technology named after its developer, Rudolf Diesel, a German engineer.

Diesel grew up in France, but during the Franco-German War, he opted to go to England. He came home after the war ended to begin studying engine design principles. He made considerable advances in the steam engine concept during the 1880s, but the coal necessary to run them was expensive and inefficient. He wanted to build something that would assist small firms in competing.

Diesel eventually figured out how to build a small internal combustion engine that could turn the heat it produced into work. In theory, one of them could convert 75% of the heat it created into energy. Because his engines were heavier and had a lower risk of flammability, the French began utilizing them in their submarines by 1904.

As technology advances, now is an excellent time to consider the benefits and drawbacks of diesel vehicles.

List of the Advantages of Diesel Cars

1. Diesel engines are extremely energy efficient.

The compression-ignition technology used in diesel technologies is more efficient than that seen in regular gasoline models. Instead of employing spark plugs to generate heat, diesels require additional compression to bring the air to the proper temperature. As a result of the increased compression level, the engine runs hotter than a regular car’s motor. That means the system produces more energy while requiring less fuel to do so.

As a result, diesel cars often get greater gas mileage than gasoline ones. You will be able to go further without having to refuel, potentially saving you money. When compared to its predecessor with identical performance, you’ll get up to 30% greater fuel efficiency.

2. Due to their engine configuration, diesel cars are more durable.

Because diesel engines must work at a greater temperature in order to be useful, engineers must design them to survive this climate. That means the final product is of greater quality in terms of material and craftsmanship. It’s a benefit that means the technology will outlast gasoline-powered products. To get this benefit, you must perform all necessary maintenance, but it is a worthwhile investment for most car owners.

Several Mercedes-Benz vehicles have original engines with more than 900,000 kilometers on them. Even if you drive a lot (more than 15,000 miles per year), it would take you 60 years to achieve that top limit. Most engines can travel 300,000 miles or more without requiring major maintenance.

3. When driving, diesel engines produce more torque.

When compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles, a diesel engine produces more energy, which means there is more torque available when driving. That means that whatever car you choose, your towing capacity will be greatly increased. If you want to purchase a travel trailer or need to move heavy items on a regular basis, this technology will provide you with the extra power you’ll need.

This benefit translates to being able to drive a smaller diesel automobile while still receiving performance comparable to a gasoline-powered passenger vehicle. Many of them can accelerate from zero to sixty in seven seconds or less while still achieving 40 miles per gallon.

4. The resale value of a diesel car is higher.

If you maintain your diesel automobile according to the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule, you’ll find that it has a higher resale value. Even if the body of the car isn’t in perfect condition, the quality and endurance of the engine will keep your diesel appealing. Long after their gas rivals have worn out, their durability, performance, and overall handling make them a viable option.

5. The quality of diesel fuel has improved substantially in the last 20 years.

In the United States, new diesel cars must comply with current EPA fuel standards and emissions regulations. Most individuals may recall when these vehicles were filthy, stinky, and polluted the environment heavily in the 1980s and 1990s. This fuel is now more pure than it has ever been. In 2006, the business was aided by the development of ultra-low sulfur diesel, which is now required to meet on-road and off-road fuel regulations. The current sulfur content requirement is fewer than 15 parts per million, although the prior maximum was 5,000 parts per million.

Particulates are reduced by 90% and nitrogen compound emissions are reduced by up to 50% when the enhanced fuel is combined with an advanced exhaust emission control system. To take advantage of this benefit, you must acquire a newer diesel engine.

6. The cost difference between some diesel cars is negligible.

Diesel cars are more expensive than gasoline-powered vehicles. Smart buying can help you drastically reduce the discrepancies. If you wanted to get the turbo-diesel Volkswagen Jetta, you’d have to pay around $2,500 more to have this technology. Driving that car on the highway on a regular basis would lower your overall ownership costs over time. To get a similar result, you could go for Volkswagen’s Golf TDI.

7. Diesel cars can use more than one type of fuel.

If you buy an engine that runs on unleaded gasoline, it is your sole option for fuel. To a certain extent, ethanol blends can be used, but they will reduce your gas mileage. When you operate a diesel vehicle, you have the option of burning multiple types of fuel. If you’re on a budget, waste vegetable oil (WVO) is a viable choice. Almost all eateries will offer you their grease for free. To keep the oil from congealing, you’d need to make an engine adjustment, but it works.

It is also possible to make biodiesel at home. When it comes to gasoline, you won’t be able to refine it, therefore you’ll have more options with this car.

8. Some diesel engines are quieter than others.

The 2018 Chevy Equinox is powered by a 1.6L turbo-diesel engine known as the âwhisper.â It acts as a foundation of support, reducing the amount of noise and vibration created when driving. According to General Motors, the engine is 65 percent quieter than the diesel engine found in Jaguar’s F-Pace. This vehicle also has a 577-mile cruising range, which means you can spend more time behind the wheel without becoming physically exhausted because there is less noise and vibration.

List of the Disadvantages of Diesel Cars

1. Diesel autos are frequently more expensive than regular cars.

A diesel car will cost several thousand dollars more than a car with a normal gasoline engine with equivalent equipment. The difference in MSRP is mainly due to the quality of the work that goes into the engine. The quality of the materials must come first, and then the quality of the fuel utilized in the car will contribute to the investment’s longevity. If you use the wrong type of fuel for your engine, you could end up spending a lot of money on something that doesn’t work out.

One example of this disadvantage is the Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel. It may have a desirable engine for long-distance driving, but it will add $4,500 to the vehicle’s base price. Most people in the United States would not be able to recuperate that increased cost due to their driving patterns.

2. Diesel fuel is expensive in most parts of the world.

When you choose to drive a diesel automobile, you will not need to fill up your tank as frequently, but you will spend more for the gasoline required to fill it up. If you commute every day in stop-and-go traffic, you’ll have to compare the benefits of increased fuel economy against the expense of your journey. One of the reasons for the higher price in the United States is that diesel has a $0.06 per gallon higher tax rate than unleaded gasoline. Diesel is in strong demand on the international market, which drives up the price.

All rates are subject to change, but most fuel stations will charge at least $0.30 more per gallon for diesel. There are instances when buying a gallon (or liter) of gas costs more than $1.

3. A diesel engine will be more expensive to repair.

Diesel engines have the advantage of being more durable, but they also have concerns with repair expenses if they break down for any reason. When comparing repairs with a gasoline engine, the cost of a diesel car is always higher. That is why it is critical that you keep up with your vehicle’s regularly scheduled maintenance. If you’re considering about buying a used car, you’ll want a reputable mechanic who is knowledgeable with this technology to inspect it to make sure it’s in good working order.

4. A diesel car will not provide the same high-speed performance.

Because of the way diesel fuel turns heat into energy, it is more efficient, just as the original principles from the earliest prototypes were. That means the heat isn’t wasted forever as it escapes the exhaust. Because engines are frequently rated in horsepower, comparing diesel and gasoline-powered designs in the same way can be beneficial.

If you drive a diesel vehicle, you will be driving a workhorse. You’ll be slower, but you’ll have a more powerful engine that can handle a range of situations. Having a gasoline-powered car means you’ll be driving something more akin to a racehorse. It’s fierce and quick, but it’s also incredibly high-strung and requires extra attention to be healthy.

5. Water separators may be present, which you must manage with the engine.

Diesel vehicles may not require new distributors or spark plugs, allowing you to save money on ignition tune-ups, but they still require routine maintenance. That means you must change the fuel, oil, and air filters according to the manufacturer’s recommendations as soon as possible. Although the cleaner fuels available today for your diesel engine do not require bleeding off extra water, most automobiles still have separators that must be manually emptied on a regular basis.

6. With diesel, you may not have as much access to the fuel you require.

If you live in Iceland, Ireland, or other European countries, you may notice that over 70% of the automobiles on the road are powered by diesel engines. When you get in the United States, that percentage can plummet to fewer than 10% in some areas. As a result, you will have less access to the fuel your vehicle requires. Because only around half of all gas stations have a diesel fuel pump, transportation might be difficult at times. You have no choice but to follow the routes taken by truckers in order to ensure that there is enough fuel available.

7. The new diesel fuel does not have the same lubricating properties as the old diesel fuel.

While using Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel reduces the amount of particles and emissions emitted by a car while driving, it also loses the lubricating qualities of prior engines. As a result, some of them may begin to wear down much more quickly than in the past. If your engine was constructed before 1997, some experts advocate adding additives to your fuel to compensate for this disadvantage.

To keep this profile, you’ll also have to deal with the difficulty of managing anti-pollution devices. Regular filling of your urea tanks is required, which can cost up to $40 every service. Because this is a relatively new technology, no one knows how long this equipment will last.

8. Starting a diesel engine in cold weather might be difficult.

Driving a diesel car in a colder environment might be difficult, especially if you have to park it outside. When the temperature drops below freezing, starting the engine becomes more difficult. As the cold gets worse, this disadvantage becomes more pronounced, with temperatures below zero being a serious threat. Because a higher temperature is required to ignite the fuel, a block heater is required to keep the compartment warm when you are not driving. If you travel regularly and don’t have access to a power source for this purpose, getting up in the morning can be difficult.

9. Diesel engines produce more noise than gasoline ones.

If you want to drive a vehicle that is quiet, a diesel vehicle is not the best option. When you drive a vehicle that runs on unleaded fuel, this technology will always be louder. The amount of sound-deadening materials surrounding the engine can be increased to mitigate this disadvantage.

A normal diesel engine produces noise levels of 100 decibels. The driving experience can become loud when you mix in the sounds of accessories and equipment. All of these concerns can be avoided by switching to a gasoline-powered engine that produces 75 decibels at 65 miles per hour. Anything louder than 85 dB has the potential to cause hearing damage.

When weighing the benefits and drawbacks of diesel vehicles, you must strike a balance between reliability and performance. A gasoline-powered engine is the best choice if you want something sporty, fierce, and eager to burn rubber. Diesel engines will always be workhorses first and foremost.

There is a financial factor to consider, since a car with a diesel engine costs several thousand dollars more. If you can afford it, the cost savings from improved fuel efficiency and less formal maintenance can gradually bring you out of debt. Failure to maintain your property might result in much higher costs, which is another factor to consider.

Diesel engines excel at traveling long distances on highways. If you’re always stuck in stop-and-go traffic in the city, the savings in mileage might not be worth it. When you travel long distances at highway speeds, you can save a lot of money on gas in the long run.