Is It Worth Buying A Second Hand Diesel Car?

With the British government vowing to phase out new petrol and diesel automobiles by 2030, many motorists are debating whether it’s still worthwhile to buy one. The short answer is that buying a used diesel automobile is a smart and environmentally beneficial choice for many motorists. While diesel engines have a bad record, they are frequently cleaner and less expensive than gasoline engines. Of course, credentials are dependent on factors such as the car’s year, make, and model, as well as how you want to use it.

Is it worth buying diesel cars in 2020?

Customers flocked to diesel because of its great fuel economy and cheaper operating costs when compared to gasoline. While diesel car sales have decreased, it still makes sense in some ways and is unlikely to be outlawed or phased out in the near future.

Will diesel cars be banned in UK?

The government has announced that the sale of new petrol and diesel cars, as well as most hybrid autos that utilise existing technology, will be prohibited by 2030.

Despite the fact that it appears to be a draconian measure, the policy may not have a significant impact. Because the auto industry anticipates that in nine years, the majority of automobiles sold will be advanced hybrids that are exempt from the ban, electric, or possibly hydrogen-powered.

Even if your gasoline or diesel automobile is still operating in 2030, there are no plans to remove it altogether from the road, as second-hand sales are projected to be unaffected.

However, the Mayor of London has proposed banning them from driving in the capital, beginning in 2025 with the central area. It’s possible that other cities will follow suit.

Will diesel cars become worthless?

The research from the major valuation agencies indicates that residual values for diesel cars are gradually declining – but not collapsing.

Are 2021 diesel cars worth buying?

I was already worried about the future of diesel ICE vehicles. The Indian government’s announcement/news today has only given fuel to the fire.

1. Would you still consider purchasing a diesel vehicle?

2. What lifestyle modifications have you made in order to stay away from diesels indefinitely?

3. Do you believe diesel ICE automobiles will continue to sell in India in the commercial and personal markets for a long time?

I like diesel for the following reasons: mile-eaters, free-revving nature, high torque, better mileage, and the ability to drive for hours or days at a time. Most of us, I’m sure, do so for the same reasons. What are your thoughts on all of these criteria no longer being available? (For example, a turbo petrol with a strong/heavy right foot will become quite thirsty.) In fact, you’ll join the club of single-digit mileage drivers.)

We had a totally diesel garage in 2016, because most turbo diesels were more fun than their petrol counterparts at the time. Today, with BS6-related modifications such as DPF; lower and shorter running; and a desire to start living cleaner, etc., half of our garage is petrol and the other half is diesel, with the petrol consigned to the city and diesels more for longer excursions.

Long road travels in India are just that much more convenient with a diesel, with fewer fuel stops, less bother about fuel quality, and possibly even cleaner due to the fuel economy, given our infrastructure.

However, unlike some turbo diesels (yeah, I’m talking about you, S Cross 1.6), petrols warm up faster in the city, are quieter, and don’t suffer from turbo lag in traffic.

I can see EVs gradually taking over from diesels as they become more common, with convenient charging stations and a reasonable touring range, thanks to their quick torque and low fuel expenditures.

The BS6 standards have caused me to reconsider; I will not purchase another (new) diesel vehicle. I don’t want to deal with any DPF clogging or adblue difficulties.

For the most part, diesels are no longer available in the NCR. Unless the utilization is really high and the resale value is negligible, 10 years of usable lifespan is far too short.

No more diesels for me. It has a lot to do with gasoline costs, not simply the 10-year NCR deadline.

To go with my Hexa, I got a Jeep Compass last year to replace my aging diesel City. My plan was to utilize it as a touring vehicle because my family is large and requires two vehicles. Since then, diesel prices have risen by 35%. The cost of taking two large diesels on a long driving vacation has been turned on its head. Flights suddenly look so much more convenient, and in many cases, even cheaper. God only knows how high fuel prices may grow in the future; the possibilities are unlimited.

I can’t help but think, as good as the Compass is. I would have converted a gasoline vehicle to CNG and used it as my everyday transportation if I had purchased one. Or I could have gotten the ZS EV and saved 3-4 gallons of gas per year. Buying a diesel no longer makes sense to me. Currently, the two fuels are around the same price. Modern turbo petrol engines are only slightly less efficient than modern turbo diesel engines, but they are a lot more fun to drive. At these prices, flying or using the train for regular long-distance travel is preferable. For a car fan, this is a difficult reality to accept, but it is a reality nonetheless.

I’ll keep buying turbo-diesels as long as they’re on sale (easily another 15 – 20 years). Reasons:

– From an environmental standpoint, BS6 helps me feel more confident about driving a diesel. In two years, the Indian government plans to tighten emission regulations even more.

– In some cases, a diesel engine is just the superior alternative (Altroz, almost all big SUVs, Thar…).

– Diesel is the only engine option for several amazing automobiles (Endeavour, Carnival).

– Diesel is the more reliable alternative in some vehicles. For example, Seltos Diesel AT vs Seltos Petrol DCT (robust diesel, torque converter AT) (complex petrol, dual-clutch AT).

– I adore the torquey character of huge diesels (although new turbo-petrols are now available), as well as their workhorse nature.

– I adore how diesels allow you to “have your cake and eat it too.” I can drive aggressively and still maintain a good FE. Even when I drive my 530d hard on the highway, I get 10 to 11 kilometers per liter. I’ve seen 3 to 5 kmpl in a 6-cylinder petrol. On a Bombay-Goa drive, I get 15 kmpl in my 530d if I drive peacefully. A 6-cylinder petrol would get 9 to 10 kmpl in this situation. My 530d gets 7 kmpl in the city. A 6-cylinder petrol engine would get 4 to 5 kmpl.

– More importantly, there is no substitute for displacement + 6 cylinders. I’m addicted to German automobiles’ luscious 6-cylinder 3.0L diesels. With 6-cylinder diesels, there are lots of possibilities (beginning with the E-Class and 5-Series), but 6-cylinder petrol options are few and far between.

– At the end of the day, if I’m buying a car, I’ll go with the best engine option for that model, whether it’s petrol, diesel, or electric.

How Long Will diesel cars last?

The ban on new petrol and diesel vehicle sales will put an end to all new petrol and diesel vehicle sales. From 2030 onwards, new trucks, vans, and any other combustion-powered vehicle will be prohibited from being sold.

The notion of prohibiting all new petrol and diesel automobile sales in the UK was first proposed in mid-2017, with a target date of 2040 set as the start date. However, in the United Kingdom, we are currently in the midst of a tremendous push for greater sustainability. Boris Johnson announced the government’s ten-point plan for a “green industrial revolution” in the UK at the end of 2020 — a determined push over the following two decades to make the UK a global green leader.

One of the plan’s main objectives is to hasten the transition to zero-emission automobiles. As a result, the ban, which had previously been pushed back to 2035 in February 2019, has now been pushed back to 2030, with a speedier transition thought possible due to increased EV production and feasibility.

Will I have to scrap or convert my current petrol or diesel vehicle?

The change in regulations will not require you to scrap or modify your current combustion-powered vehicle. The restriction only applies to new automobile sales, therefore existing gasoline and diesel vehicles will continue to be permitted on the road after 2030. Diesel automobiles are likely to be on our roads until at least the mid-2040s, as the average diesel car has a 14-year lifespan. So, if you want to keep driving a gasoline or diesel automobile, you can, but you’ll have to accept the shifting costs and laws that come with them. Many areas are likely to follow London’s lead and implement ultra-low pollution zones, therefore the petrol and diesel car ban will likely make combustion cars financially and practically unviable in the future.

It is feasible to convert your current gasoline or diesel vehicle to electric, but the process is now prohibitively expensive, with costs ranging from £20,000 to £60,000. That renders almost any conversion project pointless, especially as EV prices continue to fall.

Is it better to buy petrol or diesel car?

You may pay less per litre for petrol than for diesel, but you may wind up consuming more of it. This is especially true for longer travels at higher average speeds, which is when diesel engines are most efficient.

It won’t matter if your sole lengthy automobile trip is a 200-mile round trip to see relatives once a year, but if long road trips are a regular part of your life, you’ll likely spend a lot more money on gas with a petrol car.

CO2 is one of the principal “greenhouse gases” associated to climate change, and petrol cars emit more CO2 from their exhaust pipes than diesel cars.

Because of the higher CO2 output, petrol automobiles registered before April 2017 are likely to have higher tax rates. Prior to that date, CO2 emissions were used to compute a car’s annual road fund license (often known as ‘road tax’). This means that cars with fewer CO2 emissions, such as diesels and hybrids, are less expensive to tax.

Can I still drive my diesel car after 2030?

No, the petrol and diesel automobile prohibition only applies to new combustion engine cars; existing cars will continue to be lawful to buy and drive. Because a car’s typical lifespan is 14 years, new petrol and diesel cars purchased in late 2029 might last until at least 2044.

What happens to diesel cars after 10 years?

Diesel automobiles that reach ten years of age after January 2022 would be deregistered, making them unlawful to drive on Delhi roads.

The Delhi government will issue a NOC allowing such diesel automobiles to operate in other states, provided that the state in question does not have a similar rule.

There will be no NOC for petrol and diesel cars older than 15 years, and they will be scrapped immediately.

Those that want to keep their vintage cars can convert them to electric vehicles.

In compliance with the National Green Tribunal (NGT), the Delhi administration has announced that diesel cars older than ten years will be deregistered beginning in January 2022. This comes in the wake of alarmingly high levels of pollution in the NCR.

There is, however, a catch to this. While the automobiles will be deregistered, a NOC letter will be issued allowing them to be driven in other states, provided that the other state does not have similar laws. For example, if you have a Delhi-registered 10-year-old diesel car, you can drive it in Maharashtra, Gujarat, or any other state where the deregistration law does not apply.

There will be no NOC offered for diesel and petrol cars older than 15 years, and the vehicle would have to be demolished. The Delhi government has ordered that all vehicles older than 15 years be demolished, regardless of whether they are petrol or diesel.

The Delhi government has proposed a remedy for owners of 10-year-old diesel and 15-year-old gasoline vehicles. With the installation of an EV kit, such cars can be converted to electric. The kits must be approved by the government, which is now in the process of doing so.

Until today, petrol and diesel cars older than 15 years and diesel cars older than 10 years had been allowed to drive on the roads if they passed fitness checks. Otherwise, they’d have to be scrapped. However, the government has issued this new and tougher order in response to increased car pollution.