Is Number 2 Heating Oil The Same As Diesel?

In terms of chemical composition, diesel fuel and #2 fuel oil are nearly identical. The key distinction is in how they are intended to be used. #2 fuel oil is tax-free, which keeps prices low and makes it easier for families to heat their homes. After all, in the cold, this is a need. Instead of cars, it’s used in boilers and furnaces. It even has the same red color as untaxed diesel. Because of its intended usage, this fuel oil is commonly referred to as home heating oil.

For lower viscosity and improved furnace efficiency, #2 fuel oil can be blended with #1 fuel oil. This is also known as the kerosene mix or the home heating oil winter blend by some companies.

Given their similarities, these two types of fuel might theoretically be used interchangeably. However, there are several reasons why this is not commonly done in practice. If your furnace runs out of fuel and deliveries are delayed, you can go to a pump and purchase diesel as an alternative. Because diesel is more expensive than N#2 fuel oil, it’s not practicable for long-term use, although it might be worth it in an emergency.

Putting #2 fuel oil in a diesel vehicle is never a good idea. It’s against the law due to tax rules. If you’re pulled over and the cops notice you’re using red-dyed gas, you could face charges. Follow the law and only use each product for its authorized use.

What is the difference between diesel fuel and heating oil?

Home heating fuel oil is slightly heavier than diesel, but its heat-producing qualities are identical. A diesel engine produces roughly 139,000 BTUs (British Thermal Units) of energy per gallon, which is the same as the 139,000 BTUs produced by heating oil. The BTU content of No. 6 home heating fuel oil is slightly higher.

Is #2 fuel oil diesel?

Distillate fuel oil is a broad term for one of the petroleum fractions produced in traditional distillation processes. Diesel fuels and fuel oils are included. On-highway diesel engines, such as those in trucks and automobiles, as well as off-highway engines, such as those in train locomotives and agricultural machinery, use No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel. Fuel oils with the numbers No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 are largely utilized for space heating and electric power generation.

No. 1 Distillate: A light petroleum distillate that can be used as a diesel fuel or a fuel oil (see No. 1 Diesel Fuel). See No. 1 Fuel Oil for more information.

  • No. 1 Diesel Fuel: A light distillate fuel oil that satisfies ASTM Specification D 975 criteria and has distillation temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90% mark. It’s found in high-performance diesel engines like those seen in city buses and other comparable vehicles. See No. 1Distillate for more information.
  • No. 1 Fuel Oil: A light distillate fuel oil that satisfies ASTM Specification D 396 and has distillation temperatures of 400 degrees Fahrenheit at the 10% recovery point and 550 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90% recovery point. It’s mostly used as a fuel source for portable outdoor stoves and warmers. See No. 1Distillate for more information.

No. 2 Distillate: A petroleum distillate that can be used as a diesel fuel or a fuel oil (see No. 2 Diesel Fuel definition). No. 2 Fuel oil is a good example.

  • No. 2 Diesel Fuel: A fuel that fulfills the ASTM Specification D 975 criteria and has a distillation temperature of 640 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90% recovery point. It’s found in high-speed diesel engines like those found in locomotives, trucks, and cars. See No. 2Distillate for more information.
  • No. 2 fuel oil (heating oil): A distillate fuel oil that meets ASTM Specification D 396 and has distillation temperatures of 400 degrees Fahrenheit at the 10% recovery point and 640 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90% recovery point. It’s utilized in atomizing type burners for home heating or commercial/industrial burner units with a moderate capacity. See No. 2Distillate for more information.

No. 4 Fuel is a distillate fuel oil that is manufactured by combining distillate and residual fuel oil stocks. It meets ASTM Specification D 396 or Federal Specification VV-F-815C and is widely utilized in industrial plants and commercial burner systems that lack preheating capabilities. It also contains No. 4 diesel fuel, which is suitable for low- and medium-speed diesel engines and meets ASTM Specification D 975.

What is #2 heating oil?

Diesel oil and Number 2 fuel oil have a chemical composition that is nearly identical. The way they’re employed is the main distinction. Number 2 fuel oil is tax-free, ensuring low pricing at all times. This is due to the fact that it is used for home heating, making it a necessary item in the winter. It has the same red dye as untaxed diesel fuel and is used in boilers and furnaces. Many people refer to it as “home heating oil” because it is used for residential heating.

Number 2 fuel oil is frequently mixed with number 1 fuel oil. As a result, it has a lower viscosity and increased efficiency. This is known as the home heating oil winter blend or kerosene mix by some oil companies.

Because #2 and #1 fuel oils have so many similarities, they’re supposed to be interchangeable. This is not, however, a common practice. If your furnace runs out of fuel, you can buy diesel at the nearby gas station to keep it running. Because diesel is more expensive than Number 2 fuel oil, it is not suggested that you do this for longer than required. It can, however, be utilized in an emergency.

Keep in mind, however, that you should never use Number 2 fuel oil in your car. This is unlawful, and if officers catch you using red-dyed fuel, you could face charges. Always remember to observe the law and use each fuel oil for its specified use.

Can I use #2 diesel in my kerosene heater?

Yes, diesel can be used in a kerosene heater. Kerosene heaters are multi-fuel heaters that can operate on a variety of fuels, including diesel. In a kerosene heater, you can even use pure vegetable oil! However, some fuels operate better in a kerosene heater than others.

What is Number 2 diesel fuel?

Ultra Low Sulfur No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 diesel fuel with a sulfur content of no more than 15 parts per million. It is mostly utilized in on-highway diesel engines in automobiles.

What is the difference between #1 and #2 diesel?

The fundamental difference between Diesel #1 and Diesel #2 is the cetane rating, which, like the octane of gasoline, indicates igniting ease. It’s all about fuel efficiency, volatility, and seasonality, really.

Less wear on your engines’ batteries implies a faster and more efficient start. The increased cetane grade also helps diesel engines run more smoothly by lowering maintenance requirements.

The additional lubricants in Premium Diesel assist keep fuel system parts moving easily. The fuel pump’s and other fuel system components’ lives are extended as a result of the reduced friction.

Fuel systems can become clogged with sediments and other particles over time. While the engine is operating, detergents are injected to Diesel #1 to clean injectors and other fuel system components. Not only does a clean fuel system last longer, but it also enhances fuel efficiency and horsepower production.

Diesel #1 contains lubricants and detergents, as well as other fuel additives that improve engine performance and save downtime. Even in a well-sealed fuel system, air moisture can find its way in and cause major engine problems. Demulsifiers in premium Diesel work to separate emulsified water from the fuel so that it can be filtered out; even in a well-sealed fuel system, air moisture can find its way in and cause major engine problems. Corrosion inhibitors keep rust and corrosion at bay, while stabilizers keep blockages and buildup at bay.

Diesel #1 is sometimes known as winter diesel since it operates better in colder conditions than Diesel #2. It has a lower viscosity and does not gel when exposed to cold temperatures. Most stations sell a premium Diesel blend that is tailored to the local climate.

While premium diesel has a number of advantages, such as fewer maintenance and equipment downtime, regular diesel is less expensive at the pump, which is an essential consideration. However, total cost of ownership should take into account not only the cost savings from the fuel, but also the impact on ongoing maintenance costs. The age and size of your fleet may play a role in deciding between Diesel #1 and Diesel #2.

When deciding between Diesel #1 and Diesel #2 for your fleet, keep in mind that premium Diesel quality differs from station to station. If you choose Diesel #1, make sure your drivers get their fuel at reliable high-volume stations.

Do you want to learn more about the effects of diesel choices on fuel systems? To talk with an equipment professional, contact your nearest Papé Kenworth office now.

Can you use heating oil in a diesel tractor?

Heating oil has not been refined and is not intended for use as a vehicle fuel; when used in your tractor, it may smoke or contain pollutants not found in diesel fuel.

Can I run kerosene in my diesel truck?

Kerosene burns cleanly in most diesel engines and does not affect them. As a result, kerosene burns cooler than diesel and lacks the lubricating additives found in diesel. This means that if you use kerosene in your diesel engine, it will place a strain on your injector pump unless you use the proper lubrication.