What Year Did Ford Put The 6.7 Diesel?

At the State Fair of Texas, Ford unveiled the 2015 F-Series Super Duty lineup, which includes a second-generation 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8 turbo diesel engine and enhanced towing capabilities.

In 2011, Ford released the 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8 turbo diesel. (See previous post.) The reverse-flow configuration was a crucial Ford invention on the initial 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8 turbo diesel. The advanced design places the exhaust inside the V-shape of the engine, while the air intake is on the outside. This segment-exclusive design enhances a number of characteristics:

Is Ford 6.7 diesel a good engine?

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine from Ford may not be the most reliable diesel engine on the market, especially when compared to previous diesel engines. Part of it is due to the nature of contemporary factory emissions devices. Ford isn’t the only company having problems with some of the newer, more complicated pollution technology. Clogged EGT sensors and EGR coolers are two of the most typical issues with the 6.7 PowerStroke.

These systems, as well as a few additional emissions measures, can be removed, making the 6.7L engine far more reliable. However, there are legal and emissions considerations associated with the removal of these systems. Otherwise, keep an eye out for problems with the fuel injection pump, as a failure might soon become disastrous. Another prevalent issue is radiators, and early model 6.7L Power Stroke engines have turbo difficulties on occasion.

The 6.7 Powerstroke is a fairly reliable engine when the emissions systems are removed. Even with a few frequent issues, the 6.7L Power Stroke should last 250,000 miles or more. Maintain your Ford 6.7L engine properly, and it will most likely provide you with a positive overall experience.

What’s your take on the Ford 6.7L PowerStroke engine? Are you thinking about purchasing one?

How many miles will a 6.7 Powerstroke last?

After years of development, the 6.7L Power Stroke has demonstrated that it can easily surpass the 200,000-mile milestone with minimal maintenance. There’s no reason this engine can’t go 300,000 or even 400,000 miles if you follow Ford’s recommended service intervals. It’s also important to ensure that the CP4.2 high-pressure fuel pump is always fed high-quality fuel that’s free of air and impurities, and that both fuel filters are replaced at or before the recommended frequency. The most significant impediment to a 6.7L owner’s pursuit of high mileage is emissions system failure. Forced repairs to EGR valves, EGR coolers, DPF and/or SCR systems, and numerous sensors throughout the emissions-control systems can range from minor to catastrophic. There are numerous stories of this engine holding out in difficult situations, such as Texas oil fields, cross-country hot-shotters, and pipelines across North America, just like the 7.3L.

Are there any problems with the Ford 6.7 diesel?

Turbo Failure: One of the most serious problems with the 6.7 Powerstroke engines was turbo failure. The turbo on these trucks is a sophisticated piece of machinery. The easiest way to put it is that they created a single shaft turbo that functions similarly to a compound turbo system. On one end, it has one exhaust housing and wheel, however on the other end, it has two compressor housings and wheels. It functions similarly to a twin configuration, channeling airflow from the first wheel to the second, where it is compressed again. This increases the amount of air that a single charger can produce and ensures adequate airflow for efficient charging. The turbo troubles were most prevalent in the 2011-2012 vehicles. The bearings would eventually fail. They employed ceramic bearings in the early production models, which frequently failed. Steel bearings have been added to the revised replacement turbo, which appear to be holding up nicely. If you desire higher performance and reliability, we recommend the ATS enhanced turbo kit.

What Powerstroke to avoid?

The 6.0L Powerstroke is a well-known engine. Because of the engine’s poor performance, Ford and Powerstroke’s parent company, Navistar, were involved in a lengthy court dispute. Ford said Navistar produced a faulty engine. Ford has ignored unsatisfactory test results for the 6.0L Powerstroke, which could have prevented post-production issues, according to evidence.

As the Powerstroke suffered catastrophic failures, expensive engine replacement warranty claims flooded in. The cab of the vehicle had to be removed for the majority of these repairs. Because to this engine, many owners have lost faith in the brand. A series of recalls affecting this notoriously problematic truck are listed by Consumer Reports.

Is it illegal to delete a diesel?

Clients who wish to perform emission deletes on their trucks send us emails, phone calls, and live chats every day. All of these customers have the same issue: their automobiles require frequent, expensive maintenance, and they are fed up with it. I truly sympathize with them; many of them have had traumatic situations and are simply searching for a way out. However, before we delve too far into the weeds, there are a few fallacies that we commonly encounter.

Myth #1 – Deleting or Tuning a Truck is Legal

There is no way around it; tampering with or modifying your truck’s emission system in any manner is completely unlawful. It is not a state or local law (though such do exist), but rather a federal law. The first thing clients remark when we discuss it is that “it’s only for off-highway use” or “it’s for tractor pulls.” They believe that by doing so, they will be able to avoid any laws, but this is far from the case.

Yes, your emission system can be lawfully removed from your vehicle, but it will require recertification by the manufacturer and the issuance of a new emission label and certification. You can’t just sign a piece of paper and declare that your engine has been recertified. You’d have to pay to have your engine re-certified by the original equipment manufacturer, which is a costly process.

Myth #2 – There are no EPA Police

This is technically correct. A federal emission law, on the other hand, can be uploaded by any state or municipal government. This misconception is similar to someone declaring, “There are no IRS cops,” despite the fact that the IRS can collect and enforce laws from a building thousands of miles away. The extent of testing and enforcement will differ depending on your state and county.

Myth #3 – The EPA doesn’t go after the little guys

Another prevalent misunderstanding among clients is that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not target small enterprises. For your convenience, the EPA maintains a list of every single resolution filed against the Clean Air Act for cars, organized by year. Cases range from tuning equipment providers being taxed over $4 million to a single owner doing a DPF delete on a single car.

If you think you’re “too small” to be noticed or cared about, rest assured that you’re wrong. It only takes one employee or service provider to report the problem, and you’ll be in serious trouble in no time. If the removal/tuning has been done frequently or on a wide scale, the cases might be both civil and criminal.

The fines can quickly mount, as the EPA has the authority to levy civil penalties of up to $7,500 per day for major violations and $37,500 per day for minor violations.

Myth #4 – Only California Cares about Emissions

We get calls from county and state governments asking for a software solution to detect pollution manipulation on commercial trucks on a regular basis. We don’t have a response yet, but I can assure you that someone is working on one right now. There is a sizable demand for a device like this. The reason for this is that the fines are so high that a government agency might pay tens of thousands of dollars each month for that software and still make a profit.

California isn’t the only state with this problem. Several counties in Texas already require emission testing on commercial trucks, and states like Minnesota, as well as New York, are following suit. They’ll find a means to collect fines if there’s money to be made!

Myth #5 – Deleting my emissions will solve all my problems

This isn’t even close to being accurate. Your first task will be to find a competent “tuner” to assist you, and based on our experience, there are more incompetent ones on the market than good ones. To be honest, the truly outstanding tuners aren’t promoting because they know what they’re doing. In terms of technical expertise and capacity, the ones that do advertise are often at the bottom of the totem pole. They frequently clone one ECM software to another without thoroughly inspecting the intricacies.

So, what exactly does this imply? It indicates that if your engine is tuned by a bad tuner, you will have serious issues. Poor engine performance to your engine flinging a rod through the block are all possibilities. Inexperienced tuners, for example, will often remove the EGR on the PACCAR MX engine. The EGR, on the other hand, cools the combustion chamber. With the EGR removed, your head will shatter, and you’ll be dealing with a far worse problem. Modern engines are built to work in harmony with all of their components, and changing one component might lead to more serious issues. If you think it’s just MX engines, consider this Facebook user who had an ISX removed:

Aside from these urban legends, there are a few more things to consider.

Finding a Shop to Help You

You’ll have a hard time finding a franchised dealership to help you once you’ve removed your emissions. They don’t want to take on the risk of working on decommissioned emission equipment, and they can’t guarantee the work. That means you’ll have to find a qualified independent facility willing to work with you on your own. Even if the engine problem you’re having has nothing to do with your tune or delete, as most of you know, seeing them on the open road can be challenging at best.

Reselling Your Truck

If you ever consider selling or trading in your truck, you will almost certainly run into problems. If you sell it with parts removed, the individual who buys it or takes it in trade will have a legal case against you. You made an unlawful change without informing the customer, and now you’re facing legal (and financial) consequences. You will very certainly have to pay to restore all deleted components to their original configuration. Even taking your truck to an auction doesn’t exempt you from liability, as one forum user pointed out. Law enforcement frequently attends public auctions to guarantee that no illegal activities are taking place. Note:

Summary

There are two basic approaches for emission adjustment, according to the “economy.” The first option is to save money by learning to do it yourself. Because it requires downloading ECM information to your laptop/computer, updating the software, then pushing it back, you should have a foundation in computer science and how diesel engines work if you go this route. The actual “tuners,” who are subject matter experts, do exactly that.

These folks, on the other hand, are often hard to discover and are aware of the risks indicated above. They gain money in a different way, by selling the “tunes” to repair shops. Do you remember the guy who advertised on Facebook and Craigslist that he would do a tune for $1,000? That individual has no idea what he’s doing. He’s buying tuning files from real specialists, marking them up, uploading them to your ECM, and then walking away from you for good.

That’s all we know about eliminating and optimizing your engine. Our recommendation is to avoid it and instead work with a local, experienced repair shop that has access to necessary diagnostic instruments and repair information. You’ll be alright if your engine is well maintained and you can locate a qualified repair facility that can effectively troubleshoot emission difficulties. If you can’t find one, we recommend taking advantage of our hands-on aftertreatment diagnostics training class.

What kind of fuel mileage does a 6.7 Powerstroke get?

The 6.7 Powerstroke can get up to 30 miles per gallon on the interstate and 22 miles per gallon in the city. The engine’s combined fuel efficiency is around 25 MPG.

How many miles is too many for a 7.3 Powerstroke?

Registered. If I were to buy another 7.3, I’d probably aim to keep the mileage under 250,000. If you keep it up and take care of it, you should easily be able to earn 500,000 out of it. I operate on a fleet of 7.3l vans, two of which have surpassed 700,000 kilometers.

Should you delete a 6.7 Powerstroke?

Although there are a variety of EGR kits on the market, the process is complicated. Many of you appear to be perplexed by it. As a result, we chose the most frequently requested questions. Obtaining answers to these questions will provide you with a better understanding of the situation and may assist you in making a decision.

Does EGR Delete Increase Horsepower?

It certainly does. An EGR deletion can be advantageous in a variety of ways. However, it improves fuel efficiency, enhances horsepower, and provides you better mileage, which is one of the main reasons it is beneficial to your vehicle. All of these advantages come as a result of improved engine performance.

Can You Pass Emissions with an EGR Delete?

EGR deletion is a device that removes the vehicle’s pollution control center. As a result, your vehicle emits all of the dangerous chemicals and toxins into the atmosphere. Yes, your vehicle will pass emissions once an EGR has been removed; they would have been sent back into the engine if the EGR had not been removed.

Is an EGR Delete Illegal?

Getting an EGR deletion is against the law in any state. Getting an EGR deletion is mostly prohibited for streetcars. Off-road trucks, on the other hand, are permitted. The goal of such stringent rules is to safeguard the environment from dangerous contaminants.

Do You Need a Tuner for EGR Delete?

Yes, a tuner is required to check that the EGR valve has been carefully removed without injuring the sensors that hold it in place. It isn’t required for the removal process, but it is essential for the vehicle’s safety.

What Powerstroke engine is the best?

“The critical factors for any diesel engine surviving forever are robust, iron parts, conservative power, and low engine speed—and if a 7.3L has been carefully maintained its whole life, 400,000 to 500,000 miles is nearly certain.”