When To Plug In Diesel Block Heaters?

Many of us in the Edmonton area rely on driving to get to work, bring our kids to school, and get food for our families during the winter months. While driving in light winter weather isn’t too bad, harsh winter weather puts a strain on engines. Our engines, like the majority of us, dislike the extreme cold. They work best in warmer weather, and while we can’t control the winter temperatures, we can use engine block heaters to keep our engines warm. Many of our Ford automobiles come equipped with engine block heaters to keep your engine warm throughout the chilly winter months. The cord to plug in your engine block heater is normally situated under the hood, as seen in the photographs below, and we’ve even drawn a box around it for your convenience.

What is an Engine Block Heater?

Let’s take a look at what an engine block heater is and what it does before we get into when you should plug it in. When you start your car, oil circulates through the engine block, lubricating all of the working parts. When we have harsh winter temperatures, such as -20° C or below, the oil thickens and becomes sticky. This makes it more difficult for the oil to travel through your engine, causing it to work more, consume more petrol, and emit more pollution. The engine block heater maintains a temperature that allows the oil to remain thin and flow freely through the engine block.

When to Plug in an Engine Block Heater

While the precise temperature at which you should consider plugging in your engine block heater varies, the main thing to know is that if it’s going to be severely cold overnight or early in the morning, you should probably plug in your vehicle. Newer vehicles can usually start at temperatures as low as -30° C, but if the block heater isn’t connected, the engine will be put under more strain. To be safe, plug in your engine block heater when the temperature drops to -15° C or lower. If you drive a diesel car, you may need to use the engine block heater to keep the temperature from falling too low.

What temp should you plug in engine block heater?

McNally posted this on February 8, 2022. When the temperature drops below -15°C – or -16°C – it’s a good idea to plug in your engine block heater to keep the electricity on. If your diesel car is driven by someone who also drives a distillate vehicle, he could put it in the engine block heater before the temperatures dip below freezing.

Can I leave my diesel plugged in all night?

Is it okay for me to leave my truck plugged in all night? After three hours, the temperature reaches its highest point ever. Any additional expense is simply a waste of money. If you leave it plugged in all year (winter, summer, or in between), the engine will not be destroyed, but you will have to pay $100 every month to keep it hooked in.

Can you start a diesel with the block heater plugged in?

Having a block heater during the harsh winter months offers numerous advantages. In extreme cold temperatures, your engine will start significantly easier. So you’re set to go in the morning. It will not harm your automobile to have your block heater plugged in and start it at the same time.

How often should you drive a diesel truck?

The recommended service interval for most diesel vehicles is every 3,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first. However, depending on the type and model of your automobile, as well as how much you drive, this service frequency might vary dramatically. Short-distance driving on a frequent basis can cause oil in diesel cars to quickly acquire sludge or other impurities. It might be difficult to know when your car needs to be serviced.

So how often should a diesel car be serviced? Here are five key signs that a service is due on your diesel car.

  • It’s difficult to get started. Low compression or a fuel delivery issue might cause difficult or delayed starting. When you start a diesel engine, it’s common for it to crank a little, with a typical crank time of 3 to 5 seconds. Have your diesel car checked out as soon as possible if crank times are particularly long if the engine is exceedingly difficult to start.
  • Smoke is billowing. Keep an eye out for smoke coming from the exhaust pipe that has an unpleasant odor. You should be on the lookout for three hues of smoke: black, blue, and white. These emissions could indicate a defective injector, injector pump, clogged air filter, or other engine or sub-system issue.
  • Inability to perform. This could be a sign of low fuel pressure, clogged fuel filters, or something more serious. If your diesel vehicle is underperforming, bring it in to get dynamometer checked to discover the actual power at the wheels and compare it to what it should be.
  • Knocking. Knocking can be an indicator of the engine’s age, but it doesn’t always mean there’s a problem. However, in the worst-case scenario, it could suggest fuel contamination or malfunctioning diesel injectors, affecting compression balance and lowering performance.
  • Running in the woods. This is a common symptom of a faulty glow plug or a faulty fuel injection system, resulting in difficult starting and rough running until the engine reaches operating temperature.

Remember: Having your diesel automobiles inspected and serviced on a regular basis is the best way to guarantee they are in good working order.

Do you have to plug in diesel trucks in the winter?

Cold has the same vengeance on mechanical objects as it has on organic ones. When winter arrives, efforts must be taken to safeguard diesel engines, new oil burners, and especially older oil burners with glow plugs, in order to maintain powerplants and ensure rigs remain reliable until climates warm up.

Can you leave a diesel truck idling?

Early diesel-fueled trucks (from the 1930s) experienced a number of issues. The engine’s design made it difficult to start. The oils were thick and heavy, and the fuel had a tendency to congeal, making it difficult to start the engines, particularly in cold weather. The quality of the fuel was not as excellent, and it was not controlled as it is now.

Fuel engines and technology have vastly advanced over the years, yet for some reason, the old habit of leaving the engine running has persisted.

Myth: Before driving a diesel engine, it must warm up for 5 to 10 minutes at idle or longer, especially on chilly days.

Fact: This is one of the most popular diesel engine misconceptions. Newer diesel engines should be idled for no more than 3 minutes before driving, according to most engine manufacturers.

Allowing an engine to idle causes more damage to it than starting and stopping it. When compared to traveling at motorway speeds, idleing an engine generates twice the wear on internal parts. Idling increases maintenance costs and reduces the engine’s lifespan.

Fuel is one of our industry’s most expensive operating expenses. Idling has a negative influence on us because it increases our fuel and maintenance costs. In a truck, one gallon of fuel is consumed each hour of idling time. The bigger the engine, the more gas it uses. The price of a gallon of diesel is currently over $3.20 and is likely to rise this year. The expense of idling soon adds up with the number of pickup trucks, big trucks, and equipment we operate.