When To Use Antigel In Diesel?

During the winter, use your diesel fuel anti-gel every time you fill up. Before pumping the fuel, remember to add the anti-gel. This will ensure that the anti-gel is evenly distributed throughout the gasoline.

Do you need antigel for diesel?

Diesel fuel has a lot of advantages. More vehicle power means better fuel economy, but one of the main disadvantages of diesel fuel is that it performs poorly in cold weather. Diesel crystallizes when temperatures drop, clogging fuel filters and lines. This not only prevents engines from starting, but it can also result in costly repairs if the engines are damaged.

You should apply an anti-gel fuel supplement to keep diesel gasoline from gelling (or crystallizing). Anti-gel additives are simple to apply; simply add the remedy to your gasoline tank. Anti-gel additives lower diesel fuel’s freezing point, making it less prone to freeze in cold weather. Anti-gel additives are used to reduce the plugging point of cold filters (CFPP). The CFPP is the lowest temperature at which a filter will still allow fuel to flow through it.

The presence of wax in diesel fuel necessitates the addition of an anti-gel additive. Normally, wax is a liquid that dissolves in the fuel. The wax is the problem because it causes fuel to gel, and gelled fuel (or crystals) can clog engine fuel filters. If the temperature drops below a certain point, the engine will totally gel up and cease to function. So why don’t we just remove the wax and avoid the whole gelling issue? The wax component is there because it contributes to the fuel’s high cetane value. Cetane provides more power and improved engine response. In the winter, wax concentration is lower, but it is still present in diesel blends for cetane.

1. When the temperature drops below 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

It’s a good idea to start using anti-gel as soon as the temperature drops below freezing. As a general rule, the lower the temperature, the more gasoline additive is required. We recommend that you follow the anti-instructions gel’s on the bottle.

2. Sudden temperature dips

If the weather forecast predicts a cold front, you should prepare by applying additional anti-gel ingredient. The importance of preparation cannot be overstated. Anti-gel additives will not harm your engine, so use extra when in doubt.

3. When it comes to adding fuel

Whenever you fill up at the pump in the winter, use an anti-gel additive. Most additives can be put either before or after the fuel is added. To guarantee a good mixing, we like to add the ingredients ahead of time.

4. When the fuel starts to solidify

As soon as feasible, add an anti-gel ingredient. If your fuel has already gelled or your fuel lines are clogged, an emergency additive that dethaws fuel and de-ices filters is recommended. These emergency procedures re-liquify the fuel, making it combustible once more.

We provide a few anti-gel additives at Fuel OxTM as a precautionary step. We recommend that you use our Gasoline OxTM Cold Charge to prevent fuel gelling. We recommend utilizing our emergency fuel treatment, Fuel OxTM Heat Bomb, to restore the flow of frozen fuel lines if the fuel has already gelled. A little goes a long way with this product, as it does with all of ours; one ounce treats up to 80 gallons of fuel. A complete list of our winter anti-gel additives can be seen below:

At what temperature should I add anti-gel to diesel fuel?

You should apply an anti-gel fuel supplement to keep diesel gasoline from gelling (or crystallizing). Anti-gel additives are simple to work with. Simply pour them into your gas tank. Anti-gel additives lower diesel fuel’s freezing point, making it less prone to freeze in cold conditions. Because diesel fuel contains wax, it is necessary to add additive to it. The wax is the problem because it causes the fuel to gel, and gelled fuel can clog filters. If the temperature drops below a certain point, the engine will completely gel. Wax is present in the fuel because it contributes to its high cetane rating. In the winter, wax concentration is lower, but it is still present in diesel blends for cetane. The cetane number (cetane rating) is a measure of the speed at which diesel fuel burns and the amount of compression required for ignition. It serves the same purpose in diesel as octane does in gasoline.

It’s a good idea to start using anti-gel as soon as the temperature drops below freezing. As a general rule, the lower the temperature, the more gasoline additive is required. The best advice is to follow the directions on the anti-gel container.

If the weatherman predicts a cold front, you should prepare by increasing the anti-gel ingredient. The importance of preparation cannot be overstated. Your engine will not be harmed by anti-gel additives.

Whenever you fill up with diesel in the winter, use an anti-gel additive. Most additives can be put either before or after the fuel is added. However, if you add the ingredients ahead of time, you can ensure proper mixing.

As soon as feasible, add an anti-gel ingredient. Use an emergency additive that de-thaws the gasoline and de-ices the filters if your fuel has already gelled or your fuel lines are clogged. The emergency procedures re-liquify the fuel, allowing it to burn anew.

Anti-gel diesel fuel additive will not de-ice your gelled diesel fuel tank or assist you in starting your engine. The majority of diesel anti-gels can’t be added to the fuel tank once it’s gelled. To get the fuel flowing, you’ll need to use a de-icer additive in the tank. Anti-gel additives must be introduced to the tank no later than 10 degrees Fahrenheit before the fuel’s cloud point to ensure effective mixing. De-icers should be poured into the filters and tank to keep them from freezing. Then wait at least 30 minutes before beginning. Anti-gels must be stirred into the fuel rather than being put on top of it, otherwise they will not mix correctly. The best additive mixing conditions are warm gasoline.

Can you put too much anti-gel in diesel?

Is it possible to use too much anti-gel in diesel? You’ve probably added much too much high-quality diesel fuel additive. Overloading your engine can result in clogged filters, reduced engine performance, and potentially a whole new set of fuel and engine issues. If you’re losing your libido, don’t overdo it.

How warm does it have to get for diesel to Ungel?

In diesel fuel, a similar process occurs when the fuel crystallizes during cold weather. Gelling begins to occur when the temperature approaches 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit*, which can block the fuel system (*depending on the supply and quality of fuel, gelling can occur as high as 20 degrees Fahrenheit).

How To Tell When Diesel Fuel Begins To Gel

When diesel fuel begins to gel, Berg says there are a few telling indications, the most obvious of which is a loss of power and compression when fuel fails to reach the combustion chamber. If you could see the gasoline, it would have a hazy appearance, indicating that it had already gelled. Other indicators to look for include white smoke coming from the exhaust when trying to accelerate or the engine stopping running when you are sitting idle trying to throttle. Also, if the vehicle starts but does not run continuously, this could indicate that your fuel has gelled. Gelled diesel fuel is almost always the problem, whether it’s a lack of RPMs when an engine is running or a cold winter morning when the truck won’t start at all.

How to Fix Gelled Diesel Fuel?

Many people make the mistake of grabbing a can of ether to start the combustion process when their diesel vehicle won’t start at all. However, there are certain risks with this solution, as there may not be enough fuel to ignite. Spraying too much ether and having ether spray that isn’t contained causes even more issues. The uncontained spray might ignite other hot components, causing engine damage, or too much ether in the fuel line could simply ignite air in the lines rather than gasoline, causing the diesel engine to suffer severe damage. Fortunately, there are alternatives to spraying ether that are far safer. Here are a few preventative measures to consider:

  • Heat is the most effective line of defense. Avoiding frigid conditions by storing your vehicle in a climate-controlled garage or warm area. Other strategies include installing a series of heat-emitting light bulbs under the vehicle, enclosing the vehicle in a tarp with a heater blowing heat, and installing a modern-day block heater on the engine to keep the vehicle sheltered from the freezing temperatures. While building up the electric costs, the utility providers will adore you as well.
  • Kerosene: With the issue of staying warm when it’s 20 degrees below zero, people might experiment with different fuel mixtures. Pouring kerosene into the fuel tank to lower the freezing point is the most typical method. To take advantage of kerosene’s lower freezing point, many people mix #1 diesel, which is a combination of kerosene and #2 diesel fuel. This mix is frequently accessible in the northern parts of the country, but in the southern parts of the country, where temperatures are normally warmer, the #1 diesel may not be available. In either instance, kerosene has drawbacks, the most notable of which being reduced fuel mileage and efficiency. If, on the other hand, the truck stops running and kerosene is chosen, it is strongly recommended to leave the engine run long enough to combine the fuels and provide a continuous flow of the mixture. Consider the time it takes for the kerosene to defrost the tank in a semi-truck when operating with hundreds of gallons of fuel in a tank. The kerosene must next melt the frozen fuel lines and clogged fuel filter. The entire line from the gasoline tank to the filter to the injectors may take an hour of idle time to defrost.
  • Fuel Additives: There are now fuel additives that can provide a simple, low-cost, and no-hassle method to prevent gelling that any car owner can do themselves. “When considering an addition, Berg advises, “do your homework and analyze all of the products and promises.” “Investing a bit more time and effort to discover the greatest product is occasionally worthwhile. Additives are a means to offer an extra layer of protection to prevent the wax in diesel fuel from becoming thick, similar to wearing layers of clothing in the cold.” Many products contain alcohol, according to Berg, so look for one that provides not just proper temperature coverage but also protection for the entire system, including lubricity, cetane, water dispersion, and a success guarantee. Many preventive options are available, including some top picks being Diesel Winter Anti-Gel, which promotes coverage down to -40°F.

How to Prevent Diesel Fuel Gelling?

So, what’s the big deal about taking the effort to prevent diesel fuel from gelling? “If you contact a tow truck, you may still be stuck with a vehicle that won’t start after paying the tow cost,” Berg explains. You can save yourself the $80 and the headache in the case of a personal or light-duty car, or the $500 tow bill and missed time on the interstate in the case of a truck. Instead, taking use of the finest scientific additives could safeguard you from getting stuck in the cold for only a few dollars in preventative and an easy pour into the tank.

Emergency additions are also available for people who have failed to heed the warning, there has been no prevention, and gelling is still a possibility, or has already occurred! Diesel Winter Rescue, for example, is a formulated substance that requries gelled fuel and de-ices frozen fuel filters to restore diesel fuel flow to the engine, allowing the vehicle to resume normal operation. Diesel Winter Rescue, for example, is a good alternative to keep in your vehicle during the winter months just in case.

What diesel additive should I use?

The best additive in the game is Diesel Extreme. This one raises the cetane rating of diesel by seven points (improving the fuel’s combustion performance once again), as well as cleaning and lubricating injectors and other essential fuel system components. Diesel Extreme also aids in the removal of impurities and excess water from fuel.

Should I put additive in my diesel?

While the country’s diesel fuel supply is generally reliable, it is not always consistent. When constructing and certifying diesel engines, manufacturers take into account quality swings. In general, they oppose or advise against the use of fuel additives.

“We do not advise Volvo truck owners to add additives to their diesel fuel.” If additives are required, they should be added at the gasoline supplier terminal, according to John Moore, Volvo Trucks North America’s powertrain product marketing manager.

Last year, Cummins became the first company to publicly support a fuel additive, endorsing two Power Service products, Diesel Kleen + Cetane Boost and Diesel Fuel Supplement + Cetane Boost.

“Cummins engines are designed, developed, graded, and built to certify and function efficiently on commercially available diesel fuel,” according to Josh Hahn, Cummins Filtration’s coolants and chemicals business leader. “However, Cummins acknowledges that there are low-quality fuels on the market that don’t always meet ASTM D975, and that these fuel concerns can cause a range of problems for customers, including poor lubricity, low cetane numbers, low-temperature operability issues, and injector deposits.” When pour-point depressants, wax-crystal modifiers, or de-icers are required in cold weather operations, fuel additives may be required.”

“In recent years, diesel fuel quality has become increasingly critical as engines evolve and the diesel fuel manufacturing processes change,” said Roger England, director of technical quality and materials engineering for Cummins, when the Power Service alliance was announced last year.

That’s easy to comprehend when emissions regulations tighten and engine technology advances, resulting in tighter mechanical and engineering tolerances. In summary, because fuel supply uncertainty is unlikely to improve, engine manufacturers such as Cummins are taking steps to level the playing field.

Meanwhile, Detroit Diesel says it has no additional requirements beyond current ASTM specifications, but recommends that customers take steps to ensure they are utilizing high-quality gasoline.

“While Detroit does not directly advise any brand or type of fuel additive, we recommend Top Tier diesel fuel since it addresses many of the flaws in ASTM regulations addressing diesel fuel quality,” says Jason Martin, HDEP thermodynamics and fuel map management manager at DTNA. “Top Tier is a voluntary retailer program that addresses fuel stability and lubricity, as well as detergency, water, and particles – factors that help sustain the fuel system’s performance over the engine’s lifespan, which is a contributing factor to ensuring top engine performance.”

In North America, Top Tier diesel is available from a variety of vendors. “Because shops may also offer non-additized diesel fuel or diesel that does not satisfy the Top Tier regulations,” the website warns, “always verify the dispenser.”

What temp does #2 diesel fuel gel?

This is the problem that diesel users are referring to when they talk about gelling. The cloud point, named after the white haze — or “cloud” — that emerges as paraffin wax crystalizes, is the temperature at which gelling begins. The cloud point of No. 2 diesel fuel is 14 degrees Fahrenheit.

How do I keep my diesel from gelling?

One of the best methods to avoid fuel gelling is to keep the fuel from becoming too cold, which you can accomplish by not leaving your car outside in the cold. This technique should work in the winter if you have a heated garage or other form of climate-controlled storage facility for your vehicle. Because the fuel won’t gel while the engine is running, you can still drive the automobile in the cold. If you have to leave it outside for several hours or days at a time, you’ll need to find another technique to keep the fuel from gelling.

What can I put in my diesel fuel to keep it from gelling?

You get ready to go to work one morning, but your car won’t start. Overnight, your fuel in the tank has solidified. So, what exactly do you do?

For truck drivers, the winter months are more than just a dangerous time when they must drive extra cautiously. In fact, the colder months bring with them a slew of new issues, one of which being diesel fuel gelling. When the temperature of diesel fuel drops, the paraffin that is normally contained in it begins to harden. The wax in liquid form will solidify at 32 degrees, clouding the fuel tank. It will ultimately start to gel at 10-15 degrees and block the tank and fuel filter.

The gel point of diesel is the temperature at which it solidifies and can no longer flow through the fuel lines. The pour point, on the other hand, specifies the temperature at which a fluid begins to harden.

This is the most important one. The diesel fuel in the fuel lines has solidified and clogged the fuel filter. The engine will not start if petrol cannot enter through the fuel filter.

Some truck drivers have told us about filling up with diesel fuel in the winter and neglecting to add anti-gel treatment. When they get on the road, they discover that their vehicle is at best sluggish, and that it can’t even accelerate correctly. When accelerating, a mismatch between the intended fuel rail pressure and the actual rail pressure is detected. Because of the gelling of the diesel fuel, the required pressure frequently jumps while the actual pressure remains low, preventing the fuel from getting where it should go.

Truckers frequently mix #1 diesel, which has a kerosene blend, with diesel #2, which is utilized for road applications. Kerosene lowers the plug point temperature of the fuel and reduces its viscosity, reducing the likelihood of diesel gelling even at low temperatures.

Another typical option for diesel fuel gelling is additives and fuel treatments. They function in a similar way to the previous alternative in reducing the production of paraffin crystals. They also help to reduce the fuel’s pour and gel points. For than two decades, AFS products have reliably and affordably protected New England and Mid-Atlantic diesel enthusiasts with its patented cold weather innovations and comprehensive fuel oversight programs.

Our Winter Diesel 2010 Additive, which combines wax modifiers and wax anti-settling chemicals to improve low-temperature operability, is a good example of a fuel treatment. While ensuring fuel economy and emission management, it also provides L10 injector detergency, fuel stabilization, and corrosion inhibition.

Our technical staff is available to discuss any issues you may have about winter operability with you. They can provide advice on best practices and preventative measures that will help you and your customers prepare for whatever the winter brings. Advanced Fuel Solutions can be reached at 978-258-8360 for more information.

How cold is too cold for diesel engines?

When it comes to diesel trucks, how cold is too cold? At 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9.5 degrees Celsius), the diesel fuel in your fuel tank will gel and you will have problems starting your engine. Your diesel vehicle will have troubles if the temperature drops below 15 degrees Fahrenheit / -9.5 degrees Celsius. The diesel won’t be frozen solid, but it won’t be liquid either. You must now rely on heating solutions such as block heaters and glow plugs, which are not available on all diesel engines.

There’s a lot of debate regarding what temperature is too cold for a diesel truck. On the internet, it is stated that the freezing point of diesel fuel is roughly -112 degrees Fahrenheit or -80 degrees Celsius. Now you believe you will never be in a region that gets that cold, so you should be fine. Wrong.

It is not necessary for the diesel in your fuel tank and fuel lines to be solidly frozen to cause you problems. When the temperature drops below 15 degrees Fahrenheit / – 9.5 degrees Celsius, the diesel fuel begins to change shape and becomes more like a gel. Consider a gel-like fuel that travels from the fuel tank to the engine. Traveling through the fuel lines would be difficult, and you would have difficulty starting your engine in the frigid winter.