What Is The Current Average Price Of Propane?

The price of propane per gallon today does not compare favorably to the price of propane per gallon a year ago. The US EIA announced an average propane price per gallon today of $2.337 per gallon in last week’s Weekly Oil and Propane Prices bulletin. This is significantly more than the $2.20 per gallon propane price from last year.

What month is the cheapest for propane?

Fall officially begins this week, and despite the uncharacteristically mild weather we’ve had in the Hudson Valley in recent weeks, there’s no disputing that crisp days and nights are on the way in the not-too-distant future.

That makes now late September and early October a wonderful time to organize your next propane supply, among other things.

  • Demand is low, which drives up propane costs, while demand is at its peak when temperatures drop. Propane prices might also rise during the summer months, when people pack up their campers and RVs for a vacation or camping trip. Early fall is a “shoulder” season between these peak demand seasons, which means it’s often the most cost-effective time to refill your propane tank.
  • Weather is more consistent Sudden cold spells are more prevalent in late autumn and early winter, but less so in the early fall.
  • It keeps you prepared Extreme cold can quickly cause propane shortages, resulting in no-heat situations as people rush to fill their tanks. Cold weather can sometimes cause power outages, necessitating the use of propane to keep your family safe and warm. You’ll have piece of mind knowing that your family will be secure in any weather if you schedule your propane tank refill in the early fall.
  • You’ll have all the conveniences of home – You’ll be counting on gas to bring home comfort throughout the heating season, whether you’re firing up the propane grill for a game, lighting up your propane fireplace for a warm evening at home, or turning up the propane spa for a cold night bath. Fill your propane tank immediately to ensure that you’ll have comfort for months to come.

How long would a hundred gallons of propane keep you warm?

We use a variety of home propane tank sizes for heating. The smallest of these tanks is a 100-gallon propane tank. We’ll investigate how long a 100-gallon propane tank can be used to heat a home.

At first glance, the math appears to be straightforward. The 100-gallon propane tank, for example, will last 50 40 days if we use 2 gallons of propane every day for heating. Because of the 80 percent tank rule, a 100 gallon propane tank does not contain 100 gallons of propane when fully charged; instead, it contains 80 gallons of propane when fully charged (safety measure).

In practice, though, we must consider our heating requirements. These are mostly determined by the size of our residence (square footage). As we’ll see later, 100-gallon propane will last anywhere from 11 to 85 days depending on home size and propane consumption in the United States (almost 3 months).

To figure out how long a 100-gallon propane tank will endure, we’ll need to know the following information:

  • A 100-gallon propane tank holds 80 gallons of propane when fully charged. This is a safety precaution; if a 100 gallon contained 100 gallons of propane, the pressure on the internal wall of the propane tank may become dangerously high at higher temperatures.

We can figure out how long a 100-gallon propane tank will survive in two ways:

We’ll demonstrate how to perform both calculations. You should use the first calculation if you know your heating demand (which can range from 10,000 to 200,000 BTU/h).

The second estimate, which is based on average propane consumption and house size, is a simpler way to figure out how long a 100-gallon tank will last.

Note: You may find out how long all propane tanks (from 1 pound to 2,000 gallon) last by visiting this page.

Let’s start with the theoretical calculation, then go on to the far more realistic second calculation (house size based):

For a house, how long does a 250 gallon gas tank last?

Winter heating is mostly accomplished using 250-gallon propane tanks. You can heat the entire house with a 250-gallon household tank. The most important question here is:

A 250-gallon propane tank can last anywhere from 26 days to 7 months and 2 days depending on usage. That’s a really broad range. The utilization of a 250-gallon propane tank determines its longevity (how much propane per day you burn). This is related to the size of the house you want to heat with a 250-gallon propane tank in an indirect way.

You must evaluate how long a household propane tank will last if you intend to use it for heating. There are two methods for calculating this (we’ll use both later on), namely:

We must also consider that a full 250-gallon propane tank carries 200 gallons of propane. The 80 percent limit applies to all home tank sizes as a safety precaution.

Let’s start by looking at how to figure out how long a 250-gallon propane tank will last for heating purposes using heating demand. After that, we’ll see how long this tank will last for dwellings of 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500, and 4000 square feet:

How long would 500 gallons of propane keep you going?

The 500-gallon propane tank is the most frequent of all the residential propane tank sizes. When the cold weather arrives, you should at least know how long a 500-gallon gas tank will keep a house warm.

A 500-gallon propane tank can last anywhere from one month to fourteen months and four days. Check the chart and graph for different sizes of homes further down for accurate times.

During the winter, the average US household uses roughly 750 gallons of propane. That means the average US household will require two 500-gallon propane tank fills per winter (500-gallon tank holds a maximum of 400 gallons of propane; the 80 percent safety rule).

We’ll take a deeper look at a 500-gallon tank’s lifespan. This will allow us to more precisely determine how long 500 gallons of propane will last in homes varying in size from 500 to 4,000 square feet.

To determine how long a 500-gallon propane tank will last in your home, we must consider the following factors:

  • Your home’s size. Larger dwellings demand more heating, and a 500-gallon propane tank will run out sooner than a smaller tank.
  • criteria for heating (location). Houses in the north of the United States demand more BTU heating than houses in the south. For instance, in Texas, a 500-gallon propane tank will last longer than in Chicago.
  • What is the severity of the winter? We will burn more propane in hard winters than in mild winters. According to the data for average US home winter use from 2010 to 2016, the 2013-2014 winter was the hardest, with an average usage of 830 gallons of propane compared to 750 gallons on a typical winter.
  • Your propane-powered heating units’ energy efficiency. For example, high-efficiency propane furnaces with an AFUE rating of greater than 90 will use less propane to produce the same amount of heat than furnaces with an AFUE rating of less than 70. A 500-gallon propane tank will last longer as a result.

What is behind the rise in propane prices?

Increased propane prices can be aggravating and even painful at times. But try to rest easy knowing that propane is still one of the most cost-effective options to heat your home and power your appliances. Propane accomplishes all of this while lowering carbon emissions.

Furthermore, historical trends have proven that what goes up must come down when it comes to prices. It’s only a question of when. The feeling among the local propane companies, as well as the industry in general, is that the sooner the better.

Propane Price Swings Are More Moderate than Oil

You may have noticed that when compared to heating oil, gasoline, and other fuels generated from a barrel of crude oil, price swings with propane are more moderate. According to state data published at the end of March 2022, the retail price of propane is 27 percent more than a year ago, while the retail price of heating oil is up 76 percent.

Electricity is also not cheap. With an average retail price of 19.50 cents per kWh, New York is among the top ten states with the highest average retail price of electricity in the residential sector. To put that in context, the average electricity rate in the United States is 13.75 cents per kWh.

Propane: A Domestic Form of Energy

One of propane’s advantages is that it is a wholly domestic energy source. In fact, the United States exports roughly twice as much propane to the rest of the world as it consumes domestically.

Despite the fact that propane is still valued on the global market in the same way that oil is, the quantity of domestic North American production ensures supply stability and helps to temper pricing in the United States.

Crude oil, on the other hand, is still an imported product, despite the fact that we produce a lot of it here, and we still acquire it from certain countries who don’t like us very much.

Supply and Demand

A common factor for higher propane pricing is a mix of high demand and lower-than-average inventory. While you may associate propane with home heating and appliance use, it has a much broader application.

For example, due of its increased use as a petrochemical feedstock, the great majority of which are sourced from crude oil and natural gas, global demand for propane has surged. Many end products, such as plastic, paper, glue, and detergents, are made from these petrochemicals. The main users of propane are petrochemical companies.

According to the Energy Information Administration, despite rising U.S. prices, global demand for U.S. propane has remained stable since foreign prices for propane and other feedstocks have also climbed.

Here are a few more of the many variables that can influence the amount you pay for propane in the end.

Global Conflicts and Natural Disasters

When war, political unrest, conflict, or natural disasters such as tsunamis, earthquakes, or hurricanes strike other parts of the globe, crude oil and natural gas prices might be affected. Because propane is a by-product of both crude oil and natural gas, higher costs for these fuels affect propane pricing.

All energy prices were rising before the commencement of the war in Ukraine in late February, in anticipation of possible penalties against Russia’s energy industry if the country attacked Ukraine.

Russia wields power as the world’s third-largest producer of petroleum and liquid fuels, trailing only the United States and Saudi Arabia. It is a major crude oil and natural gas exporter.

Even the possibility of an interruption in energy supplies will have a significant impact on commodity traders’ purchasing and selling decisions. This is known as the fear factor in the frantic world of investment.

When Russia invaded and the US imposed an embargo on Russian imported oil and petroleum products, with other nations anticipated to follow suit, it created a huge energy hole that needed to be filled. Those who earn a living on the energy markets don’t like it when things are uncertain. This comprises both speculators wagering on price movements and hedgers reducing risk for their clients involved in oil production or consumption.

Propane Exports

Many people are unaware that the United States is a major propane exporter, and that business is growing. This is beneficial for the big wholesale propane providers, but it raises demand even more in an industry that doesn’t typically hold large amounts of propane at once. Many propane providers are compelled to deliver the amount of propane they’ve agreed to export, leaving even less propane available for domestic use.

Weather Extremes

A scarcer market develops when supply is reduced during a period of strong demand, such as the winter months. When a cold spell is particularly severe or lasts longer than usual, the scarcity is exacerbated. People may begin to panic buy, as we witnessed with the toilet paper scarcity at the outset of the pandemic.

It isn’t just chilly weather that can drive up propane usage. During the agricultural growing season, heavy rains result in abundant harvests that must be dried quickly and in large quantities. Propane is one of the fuels used to dry crops. Propane usage in corn-producing states normally increases during the corn harvest in September and October, followed by a higher increase in January due to space-heating needs.

Other Factors That Influence Price

Long-term considerations such as proximity to supply, transportation constraints, energy legislation, and industry patterns have all influenced where propane prices move. These concerns have also surfaced more recently:

  • Shortages have resulted from supply chain issues, causing shipment delays and higher prices for supplies, parts, tanks, and other resources.

What Comes Next?

We don’t know where things will go from here, but if history is any indication, we may expect big price drops in the not-too-distant future. Nothing will make your local propane company happier than a return to regular costs.

Until then, trust your propane supplier to look out for you, and let’s hope that we will soon be living in a more peaceful world, regardless of what happens with energy pricing.

Does propane have a shelf life?

Another reason to use Bottini Fuel for propane delivery is that propane does not have a shelf life or an expiration date. This is due to the fact that propane is non-perishable! Other fuels, such as kerosene, diesel, heating oil, and gasoline, can degrade with time.

How much does propane cost in Texas?

12th of March, 2019. According to the US Energy Information Administration, propane gas prices in Texas have recently hovered about $2.42 per gallon.

What is the capacity of a propane tank in gallons?

The typical size propane tank for barbecue grills, mosquito magnets, turkey fryers, and small space heaters, the 20 lb tank is the most often used propane tank. The 20 lbtank, on the other hand, can be utilized for a variety of additional propane applications. A full 20-pound propane tank holds 4.5 gallons and weighs 37 pounds.

What is the average lifespan of a propane tank?

Grills, water heaters, and fireplaces all use small, portable propane tanks, often known as DOT tanks. They can weigh anywhere from 20 to 100 pounds. Its lifespan is determined by the size of your grill and how frequently you use your heater or fireplace.

A medium-sized grill on high heat will use about two pounds of fuel per meal as a rule of thumb. On a medium grill, a 20lb propane tank will give 18-20 hours of cooking time if you follow this rule. In as little as 10 hours, a larger barbecue can burn through 20 pounds of propane.